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Article: Perceived neighborhood environmental attributes associated with adults' transport-related walking and cycling: Findings from the USA, Australia and Belgium

TitlePerceived neighborhood environmental attributes associated with adults' transport-related walking and cycling: Findings from the USA, Australia and Belgium
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ijbnpa.org/
Citation
International Journal Of Behavioral Nutrition And Physical Activity, 2012, p. 70 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Active transportation has the potential to contribute considerably to overall physical activity levels in adults and is likely to be influenced by neighborhood-related built environment characteristics. Previous studies that examined the associations between built environment attributes and active transportation, focused mainly on transport-related walking and were conducted within single countries, limiting environmental variability. We investigated the direction and shape of relationships of perceived neighborhood attributes with transport-related cycling and walking in three countries; and examined whether these associations differed by country and gender. Methods: Data from the USA (Baltimore and Seattle), Australia (Adelaide) and Belgium (Ghent) were pooled. In total, 6,014 adults (20-65 years, 55.7% women) were recruited in high-/low-walkable and high-/low-income neighborhoods. All participants completed the Neighborhood Environmental Walkability Scale and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Generalized additive mixed models were used to estimate the strength and shape of the associations. Results: Proximity to destinations, good walking and cycling facilities, perceiving difficulties in parking near local shopping areas, and perceived aesthetics were included in a 'cyclability' index. This index was linearly positively related to transport-related cycling and no gender- or country-differences were observed. The 'walkability' index consisted of perceived residential density, land use mix access, proximity of destinations and aesthetics. A non-linear positive relationship with transport-related walking was found. This association was stronger in women than in men, and country-specific associations were identified: the strongest association was observed in Seattle, the weakest in Adelaide. In Ghent, the association weakened at higher levels of walkability. Conclusions: For cycling, consistent correlates were found in the three countries, but associations were less straightforward for transport-related walking. Moreover, the identified neighborhood environmental correlates were different for walking compared to cycling. In order to further clarify the shape of these associations and reach more specific international guidelines for developing walkable and bikeable neighborhoods, future studies should include even more countries to maximize environmental variability.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/160079
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.993
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.216
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorVan Dyck, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorCerin, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorConway, TLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDe Bourdeaudhuij, Ien_HK
dc.contributor.authorOwen, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKerr, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCardon, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFrank, LDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSaelens, BEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSallis, JFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T06:02:50Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-16T06:02:50Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Behavioral Nutrition And Physical Activity, 2012, p. 70en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1479-5868en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/160079-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Active transportation has the potential to contribute considerably to overall physical activity levels in adults and is likely to be influenced by neighborhood-related built environment characteristics. Previous studies that examined the associations between built environment attributes and active transportation, focused mainly on transport-related walking and were conducted within single countries, limiting environmental variability. We investigated the direction and shape of relationships of perceived neighborhood attributes with transport-related cycling and walking in three countries; and examined whether these associations differed by country and gender. Methods: Data from the USA (Baltimore and Seattle), Australia (Adelaide) and Belgium (Ghent) were pooled. In total, 6,014 adults (20-65 years, 55.7% women) were recruited in high-/low-walkable and high-/low-income neighborhoods. All participants completed the Neighborhood Environmental Walkability Scale and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Generalized additive mixed models were used to estimate the strength and shape of the associations. Results: Proximity to destinations, good walking and cycling facilities, perceiving difficulties in parking near local shopping areas, and perceived aesthetics were included in a 'cyclability' index. This index was linearly positively related to transport-related cycling and no gender- or country-differences were observed. The 'walkability' index consisted of perceived residential density, land use mix access, proximity of destinations and aesthetics. A non-linear positive relationship with transport-related walking was found. This association was stronger in women than in men, and country-specific associations were identified: the strongest association was observed in Seattle, the weakest in Adelaide. In Ghent, the association weakened at higher levels of walkability. Conclusions: For cycling, consistent correlates were found in the three countries, but associations were less straightforward for transport-related walking. Moreover, the identified neighborhood environmental correlates were different for walking compared to cycling. In order to further clarify the shape of these associations and reach more specific international guidelines for developing walkable and bikeable neighborhoods, future studies should include even more countries to maximize environmental variability.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ijbnpa.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activityen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titlePerceived neighborhood environmental attributes associated with adults' transport-related walking and cycling: Findings from the USA, Australia and Belgiumen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCerin, E=rp00890en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1479-5868-9-70en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22691723-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3489620-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84861996057en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros205737en_US
dc.identifier.volume9en_US
dc.identifier.spage70en_HK
dc.identifier.epage70en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000311277000001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVan Dyck, D=35621009100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCerin, E=14522064200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridConway, TL=55047642600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDe Bourdeaudhuij, I=35510873600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOwen, N=7102307209en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKerr, J=7401908338en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCardon, G=7004013463en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFrank, LD=55246340100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSaelens, BE=6701427555en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSallis, JF=7102766542en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike10791693-

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