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Article: Is HbA2 level a reliable diagnostic measurement for β-thalassemia trait in people with iron deficiency?

TitleIs HbA2 level a reliable diagnostic measurement for β-thalassemia trait in people with iron deficiency?
Authors
KeywordsFerritin
Hemoglobin A
Hemoglobin A2
Issue Date2012
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/35105
Citation
American Journal of Hematology, 2012, v. 87 n. 1, p. 114-116 How to Cite?
AbstractMicrocytic anemia is commonly caused by either iron deficiency, β-thalassemia trait (BTT) or a-thalassemia trait. Elevated HbA 2 level (=3.5%) is a well-established screening test for BTT [1]. Conflicting reports have led to confusion about the reliability of this test to screen for BTT in the presence of iron deficiency. In this study, 444 people with BTT were confirmed by DNA-based genotyping. HbA 2 levels were assessed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Individuals were classified as 'iron-deficient' or 'non-iron-deficient' based on serum ferritin level. The mean HbA 2 (5.3%) in individuals with serum ferritin <15 μg/L was lower than those who are not iron-deficient (5.6%; P = 0.004). Nevertheless, HbA 2 in individuals with serum ferritin <15 μg/L ranged from 4.2 to 6.2%, with none <3.5%. Multiple linear-regression analysis revealed a significant association of lower HbA 2 with β +-thalassemia mutation and serum ferritin <15 μg/L. Thus, in this large cohort of individuals with BTT, serum ferritin <15 μg/L was associated with a small decrease in HbA 2. Nonetheless, individuals with overt iron deficiency and BTT consistently had elevated HbA 2 (=3.5%) indicating that HbA 2 remains a reliable test for BTT screening in the presence of iron deficiency. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/160062
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.0
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.761
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorVerhovsek, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorSo, JCCen_US
dc.contributor.authorO'Shea, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorGibney, GTen_US
dc.contributor.authorMa, ESKen_US
dc.contributor.authorSteinberg, MHen_US
dc.contributor.authorChui, DHKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T06:02:11Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-16T06:02:11Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal of Hematology, 2012, v. 87 n. 1, p. 114-116en_US
dc.identifier.issn0361-8609-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/160062-
dc.description.abstractMicrocytic anemia is commonly caused by either iron deficiency, β-thalassemia trait (BTT) or a-thalassemia trait. Elevated HbA 2 level (=3.5%) is a well-established screening test for BTT [1]. Conflicting reports have led to confusion about the reliability of this test to screen for BTT in the presence of iron deficiency. In this study, 444 people with BTT were confirmed by DNA-based genotyping. HbA 2 levels were assessed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Individuals were classified as 'iron-deficient' or 'non-iron-deficient' based on serum ferritin level. The mean HbA 2 (5.3%) in individuals with serum ferritin <15 μg/L was lower than those who are not iron-deficient (5.6%; P = 0.004). Nevertheless, HbA 2 in individuals with serum ferritin <15 μg/L ranged from 4.2 to 6.2%, with none <3.5%. Multiple linear-regression analysis revealed a significant association of lower HbA 2 with β +-thalassemia mutation and serum ferritin <15 μg/L. Thus, in this large cohort of individuals with BTT, serum ferritin <15 μg/L was associated with a small decrease in HbA 2. Nonetheless, individuals with overt iron deficiency and BTT consistently had elevated HbA 2 (=3.5%) indicating that HbA 2 remains a reliable test for BTT screening in the presence of iron deficiency. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/35105-
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Hematologyen_US
dc.rightsAmerican Journal of Hematology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.-
dc.subjectFerritin-
dc.subjectHemoglobin A-
dc.subjectHemoglobin A2-
dc.subject.meshAnemia, iron-deficiency - etiology-
dc.subject.meshHemoglobin A2 - metabolism-
dc.subject.meshMiddle aged-
dc.subject.meshYoung adult-
dc.subject.meshBeta-thalassemia - complications - diagnosis-
dc.subject.meshAsian continental ancestry group-
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshChild, preschool-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInfant-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.titleIs HbA2 level a reliable diagnostic measurement for β-thalassemia trait in people with iron deficiency?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSo, JCC: scc@pathology.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailMa, ESK: eskma@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySo, JCC=rp00391en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ajh.22188-
dc.identifier.pmid22038702-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84155172140-
dc.identifier.hkuros205183en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84155172140&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpage-
dc.identifier.volume87en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage114en_US
dc.identifier.epage116en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000298257700024-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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