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Article: " I have no time to find out where the sentences came from; I just rebuild them" : A biochemistry professor eliminating novices' textual borrowing
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Title" I have no time to find out where the sentences came from; I just rebuild them" : A biochemistry professor eliminating novices' textual borrowing
 
AuthorsLi, Y1
 
KeywordsEAL scientists
Expert writers
Novices
Publication pressure
Textual borrowing
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jslw
 
CitationJournal Of Second Language Writing, 2012, v. 21 n. 1, p. 59-70 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jslw.2012.01.001
 
AbstractEnglish as an Additional Language (EAL) students' textual borrowing in disciplinary writing has attracted wide research interest in recent years. However, much of the research was conducted in the regular curriculum setting while the relevance of the issue in a writing-for-publication context has largely been overlooked. In particular, disciplinary experts' perspectives concerning textual borrowing have not been explored in-depth. The present study fills such a gap in the literature by looking into how an expert writer, a professor of biochemistry in a Chinese university, perceived novices' textual borrowing in their initial drafts and eliminated such borrowing as he redrafted novice texts for publication. The study revealed that the expert had complete tolerance for his students' copying and that his elimination of it during redrafting was guided by his genre expertise and rhetorical skills for publishing. The paper also pointed out that the shortage of explicit teaching from the supervisor to his students as well as the lack of active participation of his students in the writing process was bound to the publication pressure in the local institutional context. © 2012 Elsevier Inc..
 
ISSN1060-3743
2012 Impact Factor: 1.138
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.985
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jslw.2012.01.001
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
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dc.contributor.authorLi, Y
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T06:00:23Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-16T06:00:23Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractEnglish as an Additional Language (EAL) students' textual borrowing in disciplinary writing has attracted wide research interest in recent years. However, much of the research was conducted in the regular curriculum setting while the relevance of the issue in a writing-for-publication context has largely been overlooked. In particular, disciplinary experts' perspectives concerning textual borrowing have not been explored in-depth. The present study fills such a gap in the literature by looking into how an expert writer, a professor of biochemistry in a Chinese university, perceived novices' textual borrowing in their initial drafts and eliminated such borrowing as he redrafted novice texts for publication. The study revealed that the expert had complete tolerance for his students' copying and that his elimination of it during redrafting was guided by his genre expertise and rhetorical skills for publishing. The paper also pointed out that the shortage of explicit teaching from the supervisor to his students as well as the lack of active participation of his students in the writing process was bound to the publication pressure in the local institutional context. © 2012 Elsevier Inc..
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Second Language Writing, 2012, v. 21 n. 1, p. 59-70 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jslw.2012.01.001
 
dc.identifier.citeulike10370652
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jslw.2012.01.001
 
dc.identifier.eissn1873-1422
 
dc.identifier.epage70
 
dc.identifier.hkuros205507
 
dc.identifier.issn1060-3743
2012 Impact Factor: 1.138
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.985
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84862776718
 
dc.identifier.spage59
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/160020
 
dc.identifier.volume21
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jslw
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Second Language Writing
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectEAL scientists
 
dc.subjectExpert writers
 
dc.subjectNovices
 
dc.subjectPublication pressure
 
dc.subjectTextual borrowing
 
dc.title" I have no time to find out where the sentences came from; I just rebuild them" : A biochemistry professor eliminating novices' textual borrowing
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong