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Article: The Intended Curriculum and Cultural Traditions - A Comparative Study of Berlin and Hong Kong

TitleThe Intended Curriculum and Cultural Traditions - A Comparative Study of Berlin and Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsIntended curriculum
Berlin
Hong Kong
Didaktik
Confucian heritage culture (CHC)
Issue Date2011
PublisherKorea Society of Mathematical Education. The Journal's web site is located at http://ocean.kisti.re.kr/IS_mvpopo001P.do?method=multMain&poid=ksmed&free=
Citation
Journal of the Korean Society of Mathematics Education Series D: Research in Mathematical Education, 2011, v. 15 n. 3, p. 209-228 How to Cite?
AbstractMany studies such as Pepin (1999a; 1999b), Kaiser (2002), and Park & Leung (2006) revealed that there is a strong dependence of mathematics teaching on cultural traditions in different countries. This study was set up as a detailed comparison between the intended curricula in Berlin and Hong Kong to explore how cultural tradition influenced the intended curriculum. In this study, the intended curriculum is what the (local, state or national) curriculum developers stipulate in the official documents. The German educational system is influenced by the curriculum tradition called Didaktik. Didaktik is a tradition about teaching and learning. Since 16th century, Didaktik has been the most important tool for planning, enacting, and thinking about teaching in most of northern and central Europe (Westbury, 1998). On the other hand, the education system in Hong Kong is influenced by both the Anglo-Saxon curriculum tradition and the Confucian heritage culture (CHC). It was found in this study that, although many studies revealed that there is a strong dependence on cultural traditions of mathematics teaching in different countries, other factors such as social factors or the education system also played an important part in shaping the intended mathematics curriculum. So a simplistic view of dependence of the curriculum on cultural traditions is not warranted. The formation of the curriculum is a much more complicated process encompassing various factors including needs of society, advancement of technology, and government policies at different levels.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/160009
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLui, KWen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, FKSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T06:00:20Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-16T06:00:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of the Korean Society of Mathematics Education Series D: Research in Mathematical Education, 2011, v. 15 n. 3, p. 209-228en_US
dc.identifier.issn1226-6191-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/160009-
dc.description.abstractMany studies such as Pepin (1999a; 1999b), Kaiser (2002), and Park & Leung (2006) revealed that there is a strong dependence of mathematics teaching on cultural traditions in different countries. This study was set up as a detailed comparison between the intended curricula in Berlin and Hong Kong to explore how cultural tradition influenced the intended curriculum. In this study, the intended curriculum is what the (local, state or national) curriculum developers stipulate in the official documents. The German educational system is influenced by the curriculum tradition called Didaktik. Didaktik is a tradition about teaching and learning. Since 16th century, Didaktik has been the most important tool for planning, enacting, and thinking about teaching in most of northern and central Europe (Westbury, 1998). On the other hand, the education system in Hong Kong is influenced by both the Anglo-Saxon curriculum tradition and the Confucian heritage culture (CHC). It was found in this study that, although many studies revealed that there is a strong dependence on cultural traditions of mathematics teaching in different countries, other factors such as social factors or the education system also played an important part in shaping the intended mathematics curriculum. So a simplistic view of dependence of the curriculum on cultural traditions is not warranted. The formation of the curriculum is a much more complicated process encompassing various factors including needs of society, advancement of technology, and government policies at different levels.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherKorea Society of Mathematical Education. The Journal's web site is located at http://ocean.kisti.re.kr/IS_mvpopo001P.do?method=multMain&poid=ksmed&free=-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the Korean Society of Mathematics Education Series D: Research in Mathematical Educationen_US
dc.subjectIntended curriculum-
dc.subjectBerlin-
dc.subjectHong Kong-
dc.subjectDidaktik-
dc.subjectConfucian heritage culture (CHC)-
dc.titleThe Intended Curriculum and Cultural Traditions - A Comparative Study of Berlin and Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLui, KW: rachel.tlc@gmail.comen_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, FKS: frederickleung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, FKS=rp00924en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros204878en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros217499-
dc.identifier.volume15en_US
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage209en_US
dc.identifier.epage228en_US
dc.publisher.placeRepublic of Korea-

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