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Article: International student mobility in Hong Kong: private good, public good or trade in services?
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TitleInternational student mobility in Hong Kong: private good, public good or trade in services?
 
AuthorsOleksiyenko, A
Cheng, KM
Yip, HK
 
KeywordsInternational student mobility
Internationalization
Private good
Public good
Trades in services
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/03075079.asp
 
CitationStudies in Higher Education, 2012 [Epub ahead of print] [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2011.630726
 
AbstractInternational student mobility has emerged as a key source of societal and educational transformations in the booming economies of East Asia. International competencies are increasingly valued by employees and employers alike. Given the uneven distribution of international student flows, and the inequitable levels of benefit that they bring to various locales and institutions, some jurisdictions are seeking the optimal policy instruments for leveraging public and private interests in the mobility of human resources and knowledge. This case study of Hong Kong looks at the outbound–inbound student flows and explains how the government facilitates cross-border education balances. The researchers utilized the four modes of the General Agreement on Trades in Services framework, and found it to be a helpful tool in analyzing the government's balancing act, despite the challenges associated with the conceptualization of international student mobility as a commodity or trade in services.
 
ISSN0307-5079
2013 Impact Factor: 1.278
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2011.630726
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000323144700008
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorOleksiyenko, A
 
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KM
 
dc.contributor.authorYip, HK
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T06:00:10Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-16T06:00:10Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractInternational student mobility has emerged as a key source of societal and educational transformations in the booming economies of East Asia. International competencies are increasingly valued by employees and employers alike. Given the uneven distribution of international student flows, and the inequitable levels of benefit that they bring to various locales and institutions, some jurisdictions are seeking the optimal policy instruments for leveraging public and private interests in the mobility of human resources and knowledge. This case study of Hong Kong looks at the outbound–inbound student flows and explains how the government facilitates cross-border education balances. The researchers utilized the four modes of the General Agreement on Trades in Services framework, and found it to be a helpful tool in analyzing the government's balancing act, despite the challenges associated with the conceptualization of international student mobility as a commodity or trade in services.
 
dc.identifier.citationStudies in Higher Education, 2012 [Epub ahead of print] [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2011.630726
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2011.630726
 
dc.identifier.eissn1470-174X
 
dc.identifier.hkuros203197
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000323144700008
 
dc.identifier.issn0307-5079
2013 Impact Factor: 1.278
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159973
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/03075079.asp
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofStudies in Higher Education
 
dc.subjectInternational student mobility
 
dc.subjectInternationalization
 
dc.subjectPrivate good
 
dc.subjectPublic good
 
dc.subjectTrades in services
 
dc.titleInternational student mobility in Hong Kong: private good, public good or trade in services?
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<description.abstract>International student mobility has emerged as a key source of societal and educational transformations in the booming economies of East Asia. International competencies are increasingly valued by employees and employers alike. Given the uneven distribution of international student flows, and the inequitable levels of benefit that they bring to various locales and institutions, some jurisdictions are seeking the optimal policy instruments for leveraging public and private interests in the mobility of human resources and knowledge. This case study of Hong Kong looks at the outbound&#8211;inbound student flows and explains how the government facilitates cross-border education balances. The researchers utilized the four modes of the General Agreement on Trades in Services framework, and found it to be a helpful tool in analyzing the government&apos;s balancing act, despite the challenges associated with the conceptualization of international student mobility as a commodity or trade in services.</description.abstract>
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