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Article: Bile duct anastomotic stricture after pediatric living donor liver transplantation
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TitleBile duct anastomotic stricture after pediatric living donor liver transplantation
 
AuthorsChok, KSH1
Chan, SC1
Chan, KL1
Sharr, WW1
Tam, PKH1
Fan, ST1
Lo, CM1
 
KeywordsAlagille syndrome
Bile duct atresia
Bile duct obstruction
Bile duct reconstruction
Bile leakage
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jpedsurg
 
CitationJournal of Pediatric Surgery, 2012, v. 47 n. 7, p. 1399-1403 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2011.12.014
 
AbstractBACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Hepaticojejunostomy is a well-accepted method, whereas duct-to-duct anastomosis is gaining popularity for bile duct reconstruction in pediatric living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Biliary complications, especially biliary anastomotic stricture (BAS), are not clearly defined. The aim of the present study is to determine the rate of BAS and its associated risk factors. METHODS: The study included 78 pediatric patients (<18 years old) who underwent LDLT during the period from end of September 1993 to end of November 2010. The diagnosis of BAS was based on clinical, biochemical, histologic, and radiologic results. RESULTS: All patients received left-side grafts. Thirteen patients (16.7%) developed BAS after LDLT. Among them, 3 patients (23.1%) had duct-to-duct anastomosis during LDLT. The median follow-up period for the BAS group and the non-BAS group was 57.8 and 79.5 months, respectively (P = .683). Ten of the patients with BAS required percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage with or without dilatation for treating the stricture. Multivariable analysis showed that hepatic artery thrombosis and duct-to-duct anastomosis were 2 risk factors associated with BAS. CONCLUSION: In pediatric LDLT, hepaticojejunostomy is the preferred method for bile duct reconstruction, but more large-scale research needs to be done to reconfirm this result.
 
ISSN0022-3468
2013 Impact Factor: 1.311
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.811
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2011.12.014
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChok, KSH
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, SC
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, KL
 
dc.contributor.authorSharr, WW
 
dc.contributor.authorTam, PKH
 
dc.contributor.authorFan, ST
 
dc.contributor.authorLo, CM
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T05:59:45Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-16T05:59:45Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Hepaticojejunostomy is a well-accepted method, whereas duct-to-duct anastomosis is gaining popularity for bile duct reconstruction in pediatric living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Biliary complications, especially biliary anastomotic stricture (BAS), are not clearly defined. The aim of the present study is to determine the rate of BAS and its associated risk factors. METHODS: The study included 78 pediatric patients (<18 years old) who underwent LDLT during the period from end of September 1993 to end of November 2010. The diagnosis of BAS was based on clinical, biochemical, histologic, and radiologic results. RESULTS: All patients received left-side grafts. Thirteen patients (16.7%) developed BAS after LDLT. Among them, 3 patients (23.1%) had duct-to-duct anastomosis during LDLT. The median follow-up period for the BAS group and the non-BAS group was 57.8 and 79.5 months, respectively (P = .683). Ten of the patients with BAS required percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage with or without dilatation for treating the stricture. Multivariable analysis showed that hepatic artery thrombosis and duct-to-duct anastomosis were 2 risk factors associated with BAS. CONCLUSION: In pediatric LDLT, hepaticojejunostomy is the preferred method for bile duct reconstruction, but more large-scale research needs to be done to reconfirm this result.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Pediatric Surgery, 2012, v. 47 n. 7, p. 1399-1403 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2011.12.014
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2011.12.014
 
dc.identifier.epage1403
 
dc.identifier.hkuros205089
 
dc.identifier.issn0022-3468
2013 Impact Factor: 1.311
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.811
 
dc.identifier.issue7
 
dc.identifier.pmid22813803
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84864121793
 
dc.identifier.spage1399
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159954
 
dc.identifier.volume47
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jpedsurg
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Pediatric Surgery
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectAlagille syndrome
 
dc.subjectBile duct atresia
 
dc.subjectBile duct obstruction
 
dc.subjectBile duct reconstruction
 
dc.subjectBile leakage
 
dc.titleBile duct anastomotic stricture after pediatric living donor liver transplantation
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Chan, SC</contributor.author>
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<contributor.author>Sharr, WW</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tam, PKH</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Fan, ST</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lo, CM</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong