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Article: Role of surgery in the treatment of radiation-induced sarcomas of the head and neck

TitleRole of surgery in the treatment of radiation-induced sarcomas of the head and neck
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherOmics Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.omicsonline.org/jcesthome.php
Citation
Journal of Cell Science & Therapy, 2011, v. S2, article no. 002 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: Radiation-induced sarcoma (RIS) is a well-known complication of radiotherapy. It is an aggressive tumour and the prognosis is often poor, despite radical treatment. We aim to investigate the role of surgery in the treatment of patients with RIS of the head and neck region. Method: We conducted a retrospective review of records of patients whom were treated for radiation-induced sarcoma at Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, between the period 1999 to 2010. Data collected included patient age, gender, latency period for the development of RIS, site of RIS, symptoms, treatment given, pathology and survival. Results: Nineteen patients were included, (M=11, F=8). Eighteen received radiotherapy for treatment of primary nasopharyngeal carcinoma. One received radiotherapy for carcinoma of the parotid. The medial latency period for the development of sarcoma was 11.1 years (range 5.3-25.1). The most common site for development of RIS was the neck (n=8), followed by the oropharynx/oral cavity (n=4), nasopharynx (n=3) nasal cavity (n=2), maxilla (n=1) and mandible (n=1). The most common histology was undifferentiated sarcoma (n=6). Nine patients underwent surgical resection of the RIS with curative intent, three and six patients achieved R0 and R1 resection respectively. Chemotherapy was used in eleven instances after surgery. Radiotherapy was used in seven instances, three through brachytherapy, four through external beam irradiation. Overall medial survival from diagnosis of RIS was 1.74 years (95% CI 0.60-2.87), which improves to 2.47 years (95% CI 0.97-3.97) when only calculating those whom surgery was performed. Conclusions: Patients suffering from radiation-induced sarcomas have a poor prognosis, in keeping with existing literature. Treatment is mainly by surgery aiming at resection with a curative intent. If curative resection is impossible, surgery may still have a role in palliating the patients’ symptoms such as bleeding, fungation, or pain
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159944
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLau, GSKen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, JYWen_US
dc.contributor.authorWei, WIen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T05:59:41Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-16T05:59:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Cell Science & Therapy, 2011, v. S2, article no. 002en_US
dc.identifier.issn2157-7013-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159944-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Radiation-induced sarcoma (RIS) is a well-known complication of radiotherapy. It is an aggressive tumour and the prognosis is often poor, despite radical treatment. We aim to investigate the role of surgery in the treatment of patients with RIS of the head and neck region. Method: We conducted a retrospective review of records of patients whom were treated for radiation-induced sarcoma at Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, between the period 1999 to 2010. Data collected included patient age, gender, latency period for the development of RIS, site of RIS, symptoms, treatment given, pathology and survival. Results: Nineteen patients were included, (M=11, F=8). Eighteen received radiotherapy for treatment of primary nasopharyngeal carcinoma. One received radiotherapy for carcinoma of the parotid. The medial latency period for the development of sarcoma was 11.1 years (range 5.3-25.1). The most common site for development of RIS was the neck (n=8), followed by the oropharynx/oral cavity (n=4), nasopharynx (n=3) nasal cavity (n=2), maxilla (n=1) and mandible (n=1). The most common histology was undifferentiated sarcoma (n=6). Nine patients underwent surgical resection of the RIS with curative intent, three and six patients achieved R0 and R1 resection respectively. Chemotherapy was used in eleven instances after surgery. Radiotherapy was used in seven instances, three through brachytherapy, four through external beam irradiation. Overall medial survival from diagnosis of RIS was 1.74 years (95% CI 0.60-2.87), which improves to 2.47 years (95% CI 0.97-3.97) when only calculating those whom surgery was performed. Conclusions: Patients suffering from radiation-induced sarcomas have a poor prognosis, in keeping with existing literature. Treatment is mainly by surgery aiming at resection with a curative intent. If curative resection is impossible, surgery may still have a role in palliating the patients’ symptoms such as bleeding, fungation, or pain-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOmics Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.omicsonline.org/jcesthome.php-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Cell Science & Therapyen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleRole of surgery in the treatment of radiation-induced sarcomas of the head and necken_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLau, GSK: lau.greg@gmail.comen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, JYW: jywchan1@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWei, WI: hrmswwi@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, JYW=rp01314en_US
dc.identifier.authorityWei, WI=rp00323en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.4172/2157-7013.S2-002-
dc.identifier.hkuros204654en_US
dc.identifier.volumeS2en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.customcontrol.immutablejt 130315-
dc.customcontrol.immutablejt 130315-

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