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Article: Targeted therapy in the management of advanced gastric cancer: Are we making progress in the Era of personalized medicine?

TitleTargeted therapy in the management of advanced gastric cancer: Are we making progress in the Era of personalized medicine?
Authors
KeywordsAdvanced gastric cancer
Angiogenic pathway
Biomarker
Epidermal growth factor pathway
Targeted therapy
Issue Date2012
PublisherAlphaMed Press, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.theoncologist.org/
Citation
Oncologist, 2012, v. 17 n. 3, p. 346-358 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death. With greater understanding of the molecular basis of carcinogenesis, targeted agents have led to a modest improvement in the outcome of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients. Methods and Results. We conducted an overview of the published evidence regarding the use of targeted therapy in AGC patients. Thus far, the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) pathway, angiogenic pathway, and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K-Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin pathway have emerged as potential avenues for targeted therapy inAGCpatients. The promising efficacy results of the Trastuzumab for Gastric Cancer trial led to the approved use of trastuzumab-based therapy as first-line treatment for patients with HER-2+ AGC. On the other hand, the Avastin® in Gastric Cancer trial evaluating bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy did not meet its primary endpoint of a longer overall survival duration despite a significantly higher response rate and longer progression-free survival time in patients in the bevacizumab arm. Phase III data are awaited for other targeted agents, including cetuximab, panitumumab, lapatinib, and everolimus. Conclusion. Recent progress in targeted therapy development for AGC has been modest. Further improvement in the outcome of AGC patients will depend on the identification of biomarkers in different patient populations to facilitate the understanding of gastric carcinogenesis, combining different targeted agents with chemotherapy, and unraveling new molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. © AlphaMed Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159916
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.789
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.391
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYau, Ten_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T05:59:30Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-16T05:59:30Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationOncologist, 2012, v. 17 n. 3, p. 346-358en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1083-7159en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159916-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death. With greater understanding of the molecular basis of carcinogenesis, targeted agents have led to a modest improvement in the outcome of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients. Methods and Results. We conducted an overview of the published evidence regarding the use of targeted therapy in AGC patients. Thus far, the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) pathway, angiogenic pathway, and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K-Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin pathway have emerged as potential avenues for targeted therapy inAGCpatients. The promising efficacy results of the Trastuzumab for Gastric Cancer trial led to the approved use of trastuzumab-based therapy as first-line treatment for patients with HER-2+ AGC. On the other hand, the Avastin® in Gastric Cancer trial evaluating bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy did not meet its primary endpoint of a longer overall survival duration despite a significantly higher response rate and longer progression-free survival time in patients in the bevacizumab arm. Phase III data are awaited for other targeted agents, including cetuximab, panitumumab, lapatinib, and everolimus. Conclusion. Recent progress in targeted therapy development for AGC has been modest. Further improvement in the outcome of AGC patients will depend on the identification of biomarkers in different patient populations to facilitate the understanding of gastric carcinogenesis, combining different targeted agents with chemotherapy, and unraveling new molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. © AlphaMed Press.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAlphaMed Press, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.theoncologist.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofOncologisten_HK
dc.subjectAdvanced gastric canceren_HK
dc.subjectAngiogenic pathwayen_HK
dc.subjectBiomarkeren_HK
dc.subjectEpidermal growth factor pathwayen_HK
dc.subjectTargeted therapyen_HK
dc.titleTargeted therapy in the management of advanced gastric cancer: Are we making progress in the Era of personalized medicine?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYau, T: tyaucc@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYau, T=rp01466en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1634/theoncologist.2011-0311en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22334453-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3316920-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84859399146en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros202651en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84859399146&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume17en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage346en_HK
dc.identifier.epage358en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000302368500008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, H=23089414000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYau, T=23391533100en_HK

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