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Article: Longitudinal predictors of spelling and reading comprehension in Chinese as an L1 and English as an L2 in Hong Kong Chinese children

TitleLongitudinal predictors of spelling and reading comprehension in Chinese as an L1 and English as an L2 in Hong Kong Chinese children
Authors
KeywordsRapid automatized naming
Reading comprehension
Vocabulary knowledge
Word reading
Issue Date2012
PublisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/edu.html
Citation
Journal of Educational Psychology, 2012, v. 104 n. 2, p. 286-301 How to Cite?
AbstractPredictors of age 10 spelling and reading comprehension skills in both Chinese and English from vocabulary knowledge, phonological awareness, rapid automatized naming (RAN), and word reading at age 8 were tested in this longitudinal study of 141 Hong Kong Chinese children learning to read English as a second language. The correlation between spelling in Chinese and English was .64, whereas the correlation between reading comprehension in the two languages was .66. For both Chinese and English spelling, only RAN and word reading in the target language were unique predictors; this association of RAN to spelling was reduced once concurrent spelling in the other language was statistically controlled. In contrast, longitudinal predictors of English reading comprehension were vocabulary knowledge in both Chinese and English, as well as phonological awareness and English word reading. Father's income was a reliable longitudinal predictor of English but not Chinese reading comprehension; girls also tended to be better readers than boys overall. With all other literacy variables included in separate regression equations, spelling or reading comprehension in the other language was uniquely associated with spelling or reading comprehension in the target language, supporting the notion of transfer for each skill. Findings highlight the possibility of transfer in both spelling and reading comprehension from Chinese to English and show that unique longitudinal predictors of L2 English spelling and reading comprehension differ in predictable ways. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159893
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.256
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.828
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTong, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorMcBride-Chang, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorShu, Hen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T05:58:51Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-16T05:58:51Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Educational Psychology, 2012, v. 104 n. 2, p. 286-301en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-0663-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159893-
dc.description.abstractPredictors of age 10 spelling and reading comprehension skills in both Chinese and English from vocabulary knowledge, phonological awareness, rapid automatized naming (RAN), and word reading at age 8 were tested in this longitudinal study of 141 Hong Kong Chinese children learning to read English as a second language. The correlation between spelling in Chinese and English was .64, whereas the correlation between reading comprehension in the two languages was .66. For both Chinese and English spelling, only RAN and word reading in the target language were unique predictors; this association of RAN to spelling was reduced once concurrent spelling in the other language was statistically controlled. In contrast, longitudinal predictors of English reading comprehension were vocabulary knowledge in both Chinese and English, as well as phonological awareness and English word reading. Father's income was a reliable longitudinal predictor of English but not Chinese reading comprehension; girls also tended to be better readers than boys overall. With all other literacy variables included in separate regression equations, spelling or reading comprehension in the other language was uniquely associated with spelling or reading comprehension in the target language, supporting the notion of transfer for each skill. Findings highlight the possibility of transfer in both spelling and reading comprehension from Chinese to English and show that unique longitudinal predictors of L2 English spelling and reading comprehension differ in predictable ways. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/edu.html-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Educational Psychologyen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Educational Psychology. Copyright © American Psychological Association.-
dc.subjectRapid automatized naming-
dc.subjectReading comprehension-
dc.subjectVocabulary knowledge-
dc.subjectWord reading-
dc.titleLongitudinal predictors of spelling and reading comprehension in Chinese as an L1 and English as an L2 in Hong Kong Chinese childrenen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMcBride-Chang, C: cmcbride@psy.cuhk.edu.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, A: amywong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, AMY=rp00973en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/a0026445-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84874361777-
dc.identifier.hkuros205110en_US
dc.identifier.volume104en_US
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage286en_US
dc.identifier.epage301en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000303966600002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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