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Article: "I know you can hear me": Neural correlates of feigned hearing loss
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Title"I know you can hear me": Neural correlates of feigned hearing loss
 
AuthorsMcpherson, B2
Mcmahon, K1
Wilson, W1
Copland, D1
 
KeywordsDeception
FMRI
Hearing loss
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/38751
 
CitationHuman Brain Mapping, 2012, v. 33 n. 8, p. 1964-1972 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.21337
 
AbstractIn the assessment of human hearing, it is often important to determine whether hearing loss is organic or nonorganic in nature. Nonorganic, or functional, hearing loss is often associated with deceptive intention on the part of the listener. Over the past decade, functional neuroimaging has been used to study the neural correlates of deception, and studies have consistently highlighted the contribution of the prefrontal cortex in such behaviors. Can patterns of brain activity be similarly used to detect when an individual is feigning a hearing loss? To answer this question, 15 adult participants were requested to respond to pure tones and simple words correctly, incorrectly, randomly, or with the intent to feign a hearing loss. As predicted, more activity was observed in the prefrontal cortices (as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging), and delayed behavioral reaction times were noted, when the participants feigned a hearing loss or responded randomly versus when they responded correctly or incorrectly. The results suggest that cortical imaging techniques could play a role in identifying individuals who are feigning hearing loss. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
 
ISSN1065-9471
2012 Impact Factor: 6.878
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.002
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.21337
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorMcpherson, B
 
dc.contributor.authorMcmahon, K
 
dc.contributor.authorWilson, W
 
dc.contributor.authorCopland, D
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T05:58:51Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-16T05:58:51Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractIn the assessment of human hearing, it is often important to determine whether hearing loss is organic or nonorganic in nature. Nonorganic, or functional, hearing loss is often associated with deceptive intention on the part of the listener. Over the past decade, functional neuroimaging has been used to study the neural correlates of deception, and studies have consistently highlighted the contribution of the prefrontal cortex in such behaviors. Can patterns of brain activity be similarly used to detect when an individual is feigning a hearing loss? To answer this question, 15 adult participants were requested to respond to pure tones and simple words correctly, incorrectly, randomly, or with the intent to feign a hearing loss. As predicted, more activity was observed in the prefrontal cortices (as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging), and delayed behavioral reaction times were noted, when the participants feigned a hearing loss or responded randomly versus when they responded correctly or incorrectly. The results suggest that cortical imaging techniques could play a role in identifying individuals who are feigning hearing loss. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationHuman Brain Mapping, 2012, v. 33 n. 8, p. 1964-1972 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.21337
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.21337
 
dc.identifier.eissn1097-0193
 
dc.identifier.epage1972
 
dc.identifier.hkuros205017
 
dc.identifier.issn1065-9471
2012 Impact Factor: 6.878
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.002
 
dc.identifier.issue8
 
dc.identifier.pmid21761506
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84862010624
 
dc.identifier.spage1964
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159891
 
dc.identifier.volume33
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/38751
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofHuman Brain Mapping
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectDeception
 
dc.subjectFMRI
 
dc.subjectHearing loss
 
dc.title"I know you can hear me": Neural correlates of feigned hearing loss
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. University of Queensland
  2. The University of Hong Kong