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Article: Stakeholders’ perspective: Injury behaviour and attitude of young Asians in New Zealand

TitleStakeholders’ perspective: Injury behaviour and attitude of young Asians in New Zealand
Authors
KeywordsAsian
New Zealand
Protective factors
Risk management
Tertiary education
Issue Date2011
PublisherEmerald Group Publishing Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=1747-9894
Citation
International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, 2011, v. 7 n. 2, p. 106-115 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose – Of the unintentional injuries sustained by 20-25 year old Asians, one-third have been attributed to road traffic crashes. This study seeks to examine stakeholders' perceptions of Asian youth injury prevention behaviours in Auckland, New Zealand. Design/methodology/approach – Information was collected through face-to-face individual interviews, with key stakeholders who were aware of youth injury prevention and road traffic safety issues. Analysis used the statements of the discussants as the basis of describing the findings. Findings – Risk-taking behaviours, environment, and individual variations in attitudes influence the occurrence of injuries among Asian migrant students. Domestic injuries of students from affluent backgrounds were linked to their inexperience in domestic or kitchen work. Injuries also resulted from unprovoked race-related street assaults by locals. Road traffic injuries may be attributed to the driving quality of some Asian youths and are influenced by traffic orientations of their country of origin. Migrant youths are often reluctant to seek medical help for their injuries due to precarious employment situations. Asian youths are reactive to minor injuries and expect robust medical procedures. Mental health and suicidal status is hard to assess due to stigma. Family pressure and limited involvement with alcohol and drugs have a protective effect against injuries. Research limitations/implications – While some Asian family values are protective against youth injury risk behaviours, negative parental attitudes may have the opposite effect. This has implications for community-based prevention programmes. Under-reporting of injuries and unprovoked racial attacks on Asian youths are of great concern. Further research on mental health and suicidal behaviour of Asian students and culturally appropriate injury prevention programmes are advocated. Originality/value – The paper explores risk behaviours and attitudes towards prevention of injuries among young Asian students, including levels of knowledge and awareness, and their risk modifying intentions, from the viewpoint of professional stakeholders.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159873
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.261

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHoque, MEen_US
dc.contributor.authorRossen, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorTse, SSKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T05:58:25Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-16T05:58:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, 2011, v. 7 n. 2, p. 106-115en_US
dc.identifier.issn1747-9894-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159873-
dc.description.abstractPurpose – Of the unintentional injuries sustained by 20-25 year old Asians, one-third have been attributed to road traffic crashes. This study seeks to examine stakeholders' perceptions of Asian youth injury prevention behaviours in Auckland, New Zealand. Design/methodology/approach – Information was collected through face-to-face individual interviews, with key stakeholders who were aware of youth injury prevention and road traffic safety issues. Analysis used the statements of the discussants as the basis of describing the findings. Findings – Risk-taking behaviours, environment, and individual variations in attitudes influence the occurrence of injuries among Asian migrant students. Domestic injuries of students from affluent backgrounds were linked to their inexperience in domestic or kitchen work. Injuries also resulted from unprovoked race-related street assaults by locals. Road traffic injuries may be attributed to the driving quality of some Asian youths and are influenced by traffic orientations of their country of origin. Migrant youths are often reluctant to seek medical help for their injuries due to precarious employment situations. Asian youths are reactive to minor injuries and expect robust medical procedures. Mental health and suicidal status is hard to assess due to stigma. Family pressure and limited involvement with alcohol and drugs have a protective effect against injuries. Research limitations/implications – While some Asian family values are protective against youth injury risk behaviours, negative parental attitudes may have the opposite effect. This has implications for community-based prevention programmes. Under-reporting of injuries and unprovoked racial attacks on Asian youths are of great concern. Further research on mental health and suicidal behaviour of Asian students and culturally appropriate injury prevention programmes are advocated. Originality/value – The paper explores risk behaviours and attitudes towards prevention of injuries among young Asian students, including levels of knowledge and awareness, and their risk modifying intentions, from the viewpoint of professional stakeholders.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=1747-9894-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Migration, Health and Social Careen_US
dc.subjectAsian-
dc.subjectNew Zealand-
dc.subjectProtective factors-
dc.subjectRisk management-
dc.subjectTertiary education-
dc.titleStakeholders’ perspective: Injury behaviour and attitude of young Asians in New Zealanden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTse, SSK: samsont@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTse, SSK=rp00627en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/17479891111180075-
dc.identifier.hkuros205487en_US
dc.identifier.volume7en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage106en_US
dc.identifier.epage115en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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