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Article: Knowledge and attitude of young Asians towards injury prevention in New Zealand: A qualitative analysis

TitleKnowledge and attitude of young Asians towards injury prevention in New Zealand: A qualitative analysis
Authors
KeywordsAccidents
Asian
Behaviour
New Zealand
Protective factors
Issue Date2011
PublisherEmerald Group Publishing Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=1747-9894
Citation
International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, 2011, v. 7 n. 2, p. 93-105 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose – Injuries are influenced by individual attitudes and risk-taking behaviours and the identification of these factors is vital for the development of effective injury prevention strategies. This paper aims to examine the injury risk behaviours and attitudes towards injury prevention among young Asians in Auckland, New Zealand and their willingness to modify behaviours and attitudes. Design/methodology/approach – A total of four focus group discussions with Asian tertiary students were conducted to discuss injury-related issues and their preventions. Analysis used statements drawn from the focus group discussions and were summarised to draw conclusions. Findings – Injuries related to sports were the most frequently occurring, followed by domestic, workplace and traffic injuries. Cultural identity and family values were thought to have an influence on students' risk behaviours. Family convictism and positive peer pressure protects students from participating in risky sports and using recreational drugs. International students were vulnerable to risky behaviours due to isolation and were less likely to engage in health promotion and prevention activities. Family hierarchy and cultural orientations prevented some Asian students from discussing personal issues with parents and impeded gathering injury prevention skills. Research limitations/implications – Prioritisation of domestic injuries with suspected under-reporting, marginalisation and social isolation discourages sections of Asian youths from reporting injuries or seeking help. There is a paucity of knowledge about the mental health and suicidal behaviours of Asian students, which requires further investigation. More social research is warranted to understand the injury risk behaviours of Asian youths in order to develop an effective prevention strategy. Originality/value – This study demonstrates how family values generate protective attitudes against injury risk behaviours among young Asians.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159872
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.261

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHoque, MEen_US
dc.contributor.authorTse, SSKen_US
dc.contributor.authorRossen, Fen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T05:58:25Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-16T05:58:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, 2011, v. 7 n. 2, p. 93-105en_US
dc.identifier.issn1747-9894-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159872-
dc.description.abstractPurpose – Injuries are influenced by individual attitudes and risk-taking behaviours and the identification of these factors is vital for the development of effective injury prevention strategies. This paper aims to examine the injury risk behaviours and attitudes towards injury prevention among young Asians in Auckland, New Zealand and their willingness to modify behaviours and attitudes. Design/methodology/approach – A total of four focus group discussions with Asian tertiary students were conducted to discuss injury-related issues and their preventions. Analysis used statements drawn from the focus group discussions and were summarised to draw conclusions. Findings – Injuries related to sports were the most frequently occurring, followed by domestic, workplace and traffic injuries. Cultural identity and family values were thought to have an influence on students' risk behaviours. Family convictism and positive peer pressure protects students from participating in risky sports and using recreational drugs. International students were vulnerable to risky behaviours due to isolation and were less likely to engage in health promotion and prevention activities. Family hierarchy and cultural orientations prevented some Asian students from discussing personal issues with parents and impeded gathering injury prevention skills. Research limitations/implications – Prioritisation of domestic injuries with suspected under-reporting, marginalisation and social isolation discourages sections of Asian youths from reporting injuries or seeking help. There is a paucity of knowledge about the mental health and suicidal behaviours of Asian students, which requires further investigation. More social research is warranted to understand the injury risk behaviours of Asian youths in order to develop an effective prevention strategy. Originality/value – This study demonstrates how family values generate protective attitudes against injury risk behaviours among young Asians.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=1747-9894-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Migration, Health and Social Careen_US
dc.subjectAccidents-
dc.subjectAsian-
dc.subjectBehaviour-
dc.subjectNew Zealand-
dc.subjectProtective factors-
dc.titleKnowledge and attitude of young Asians towards injury prevention in New Zealand: A qualitative analysisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTse, SSK: samsont@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTse, SSK=rp00627en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/17479891111180066-
dc.identifier.hkuros205485en_US
dc.identifier.volume7en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage93en_US
dc.identifier.epage105en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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