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Article: Families and family therapy in Hong Kong

TitleFamilies and family therapy in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/09540261.asp
Citation
International Review Of Psychiatry, 2012, v. 24 n. 2, p. 115-120 How to Cite?
AbstractFamily therapy views humans not as separate entities, but as embedded in a network of relationships, highlighting the reciprocal influences of one's behaviours on one another. This article gives an overview of family demographics and the implementation of family therapy in Hong Kong. We start with a review of the family demographics in Hong Kong and brief notes on families in mainland China. Demographics show that the landscape has changed markedly in the past decade, with more cross-border marriages, an increased divorce rate, and an ageing overall population all of which could mean that there is increasing demand for professional family therapy interventions. However, only a limited number of professionals are practising the systems-based approach in Hong Kong. Some possible reasons as to why family therapy is not well disseminated and practised are discussed. These reasons include a lack of mental health policy to support family therapy, a lack of systematic family therapy training, and a shortage of skilled professionals. Furthermore, challenges in applying the western model in Chinese culture are also outlined. We conclude that more future research is warranted to investigate how family therapy can be adapted for Chinese families. © 2012 Institute of Psychiatry.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159865
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.275
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.043
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTse, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNg, RMKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTonsing, KNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRan, Men_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T05:58:22Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-16T05:58:22Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Review Of Psychiatry, 2012, v. 24 n. 2, p. 115-120en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0954-0261en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159865-
dc.description.abstractFamily therapy views humans not as separate entities, but as embedded in a network of relationships, highlighting the reciprocal influences of one's behaviours on one another. This article gives an overview of family demographics and the implementation of family therapy in Hong Kong. We start with a review of the family demographics in Hong Kong and brief notes on families in mainland China. Demographics show that the landscape has changed markedly in the past decade, with more cross-border marriages, an increased divorce rate, and an ageing overall population all of which could mean that there is increasing demand for professional family therapy interventions. However, only a limited number of professionals are practising the systems-based approach in Hong Kong. Some possible reasons as to why family therapy is not well disseminated and practised are discussed. These reasons include a lack of mental health policy to support family therapy, a lack of systematic family therapy training, and a shortage of skilled professionals. Furthermore, challenges in applying the western model in Chinese culture are also outlined. We conclude that more future research is warranted to investigate how family therapy can be adapted for Chinese families. © 2012 Institute of Psychiatry.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/09540261.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Review of Psychiatryen_HK
dc.titleFamilies and family therapy in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTse, S: samsont@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailRan, M: msran@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTse, S=rp00627en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityRan, M=rp01788en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/09540261.2012.656304en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22515459-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84860170792en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros205469en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros234977-
dc.identifier.hkuros234972-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84860170792&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume24en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage115en_HK
dc.identifier.epage120en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1369-1627-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000303237100007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTse, S=7006643163en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, RMK=7102153803en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTonsing, KN=46462021700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRan, M=55195103300en_HK

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