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Article: WAVE: Working with Adults who are Vulnerable - A Comparison of Curricula, Policies and Constructions

TitleWAVE: Working with Adults who are Vulnerable - A Comparison of Curricula, Policies and Constructions
Authors
KeywordsVulnerability
Social work curriculum
Education
Cross national research
Issue Date2012
PublisherPolirom Publishing House. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.revistadeasistentasociala.ro/index.pl/home_en
Citation
Revista de Asistenta Sociala, 2012, n. 3, p. 1-18 How to Cite?
Social Work Review, 2012, n. 3, p. 1-18 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper reports a project examining curricula information from a number of social work programmes around the world. The research scoped knowledge of social work education responses to ‘adults who are vulnerable’ from seven universities in seven different countries. The project examined some of the issues arising from the contested term ‘vulnerability’ and sets the discussion within social work, accepting that anyone can be vulnerable in given situations, that it has been seen to be a term which has generated negative assumptions, nonetheless it is employed within social work education. A literature search showed a paucity of research, and indicating that ‘vulnerability’ of the curriculum itself was a concern, that people could become vulnerable through attitudes to social divisions, and through susceptibility to harm, ill-health and violence. The research team hoped to develop shared understandings and approaches that will help develop innovative international curriculum response to questions concerning the contested concept of adult vulnerability. Problems in collecting, translating and analysing the data initially retarded the study’s progress, but provided interesting reflexive data concerning some of the complex factors involved in conducting virtual trans-national research. Changes were made to the original project brief to ensure its completion. A model showing the interrelationships between social work as a ritual performance enacted through everyday practices, and a desire to develop global (soft) isomorphic approaches to vulnerability was developed to help explain social work approaches to vulnerability.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159855
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorParker, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorCrabtree, SAen_US
dc.contributor.authorChui, WHen_US
dc.contributor.authorKumagai, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorBaba, Ien_US
dc.contributor.authorAzman, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorHaselbacher, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorAshkanani, HRen_US
dc.contributor.authorSzto, Pen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T05:58:20Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-16T05:58:20Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationRevista de Asistenta Sociala, 2012, n. 3, p. 1-18en_US
dc.identifier.citationSocial Work Review, 2012, n. 3, p. 1-18-
dc.identifier.issn1583-0608-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159855-
dc.description.abstractThis paper reports a project examining curricula information from a number of social work programmes around the world. The research scoped knowledge of social work education responses to ‘adults who are vulnerable’ from seven universities in seven different countries. The project examined some of the issues arising from the contested term ‘vulnerability’ and sets the discussion within social work, accepting that anyone can be vulnerable in given situations, that it has been seen to be a term which has generated negative assumptions, nonetheless it is employed within social work education. A literature search showed a paucity of research, and indicating that ‘vulnerability’ of the curriculum itself was a concern, that people could become vulnerable through attitudes to social divisions, and through susceptibility to harm, ill-health and violence. The research team hoped to develop shared understandings and approaches that will help develop innovative international curriculum response to questions concerning the contested concept of adult vulnerability. Problems in collecting, translating and analysing the data initially retarded the study’s progress, but provided interesting reflexive data concerning some of the complex factors involved in conducting virtual trans-national research. Changes were made to the original project brief to ensure its completion. A model showing the interrelationships between social work as a ritual performance enacted through everyday practices, and a desire to develop global (soft) isomorphic approaches to vulnerability was developed to help explain social work approaches to vulnerability.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPolirom Publishing House. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.revistadeasistentasociala.ro/index.pl/home_enen_US
dc.relation.ispartofRevista de Asistenta Socialaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Work Review-
dc.subjectVulnerability-
dc.subjectSocial work curriculum-
dc.subjectEducation-
dc.subjectCross national research-
dc.titleWAVE: Working with Adults who are Vulnerable - A Comparison of Curricula, Policies and Constructionsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChui, WH: ericchui@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChui, WH=rp00854en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros204418en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage1en_US
dc.identifier.epage18en_US
dc.publisher.placeRomania-

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