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Article: How is the self-image formed and enhanced among older Chinese people: through assimilation or contrast?

TitleHow is the self-image formed and enhanced among older Chinese people: through assimilation or contrast?
Authors
KeywordsAging
Asian continental ancestry group
Self concept
Issue Date2011
PublisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkag.org/Publications/AJGG/Publications_AJGG.htm
Citation
Asian Journal of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 2011, v. 6 n. 1, p. 22-28 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. Older people who view themselves positively, instead of accepting negative stereotyping, are more likely to achieve successful ageing. We examined the means by which elderly Chinese form and enhance their self-image, either through assimilation or downward comparison. Methods. 445 older people in Wuhan, China were asked to fill in the revised Chinese version of the Image of Aging Scale. A canonical correlation analysis was conducted using the older people’s 5 peerimage variables as predictors of the 5 self-image variables to evaluate the multivariate shared relationship between these 2 sets of variables. Results. A positive correlation was identified between peer- and selfimage in elderly Chinese, making the internalisation assumption of assimilation effect more plausible than the downward comparison assumption of contrast effect. Conclusion. Elderly Chinese tend to form their self-image through assimilation (internalisation) rather than downward comparison. This finding enables us to help older Chinese establish a positive self-image more effectively.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159839
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.116

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBai, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorChow, NWSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T05:58:15Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-16T05:58:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationAsian Journal of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 2011, v. 6 n. 1, p. 22-28en_US
dc.identifier.issn1819-1576-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159839-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Older people who view themselves positively, instead of accepting negative stereotyping, are more likely to achieve successful ageing. We examined the means by which elderly Chinese form and enhance their self-image, either through assimilation or downward comparison. Methods. 445 older people in Wuhan, China were asked to fill in the revised Chinese version of the Image of Aging Scale. A canonical correlation analysis was conducted using the older people’s 5 peerimage variables as predictors of the 5 self-image variables to evaluate the multivariate shared relationship between these 2 sets of variables. Results. A positive correlation was identified between peer- and selfimage in elderly Chinese, making the internalisation assumption of assimilation effect more plausible than the downward comparison assumption of contrast effect. Conclusion. Elderly Chinese tend to form their self-image through assimilation (internalisation) rather than downward comparison. This finding enables us to help older Chinese establish a positive self-image more effectively.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkag.org/Publications/AJGG/Publications_AJGG.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAsian Journal of Gerontology and Geriatricsen_US
dc.rightsAsian Journal of Gerontology and Geriatrics. Copyright © Hong Kong Academy of Medicine Press.-
dc.subjectAging-
dc.subjectAsian continental ancestry group-
dc.subjectSelf concept-
dc.titleHow is the self-image formed and enhanced among older Chinese people: through assimilation or contrast?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailBai, X: xuebai@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChow, NWS: hrnwcws@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChow, NWS=rp00582en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros204193en_US
dc.identifier.volume6en_US
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage22en_US
dc.identifier.epage28en_US
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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