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Article: Iatrogenic mitochondriopathies: a recent lesson from nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors

TitleIatrogenic mitochondriopathies: a recent lesson from nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherSpringer New York LLC.
Citation
Advances in experimental medicine and biology, 2012, v. 942, p. 347-369 How to Cite?
AbstractThe use of nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) has revolutionized the treatment of infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis-B virus. NRTIs can suppress viral replication in the long-term, but possess significant toxicity that can seriously compromise treatment effectiveness. The major toxicity of NRTIs is mitochondrial toxicity. This manifests as serious side effects such as myopathy, peripheral neuropathy and lactic acidosis. In general, it is believed that the mitochondrial pathogenesis is closely related to the effect of NRTIs on mitochondrial DNA polymerase-gamma. Depletion and mutation of mitochondrial DNA during chronic NRTI therapy may lead to cellular respiratory dysfunction and release of reactive oxidative species, resulting in cellular damage. It is now apparent that the etiology is far more complex than originally thought. It appears to involve multiple mechanisms as well as host factors such as HIV per se, inborn mitochondrial mutation, and sex. Management of mitochondrial toxicity during NRTI therapy remains a challenge. Interruption of NRTI therapy and substitution of the causative agents with alternative better-tolerated NRTIs represents the mainstay of management for mitochondrial toxicity and its clinical manifestations. A range of pharmacological approaches has been proposed as treatments and prophylaxes.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159771
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.953
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.887
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GPHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T05:56:15Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-16T05:56:15Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAdvances in experimental medicine and biology, 2012, v. 942, p. 347-369en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0065-2598en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159771-
dc.description.abstractThe use of nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) has revolutionized the treatment of infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis-B virus. NRTIs can suppress viral replication in the long-term, but possess significant toxicity that can seriously compromise treatment effectiveness. The major toxicity of NRTIs is mitochondrial toxicity. This manifests as serious side effects such as myopathy, peripheral neuropathy and lactic acidosis. In general, it is believed that the mitochondrial pathogenesis is closely related to the effect of NRTIs on mitochondrial DNA polymerase-gamma. Depletion and mutation of mitochondrial DNA during chronic NRTI therapy may lead to cellular respiratory dysfunction and release of reactive oxidative species, resulting in cellular damage. It is now apparent that the etiology is far more complex than originally thought. It appears to involve multiple mechanisms as well as host factors such as HIV per se, inborn mitochondrial mutation, and sex. Management of mitochondrial toxicity during NRTI therapy remains a challenge. Interruption of NRTI therapy and substitution of the causative agents with alternative better-tolerated NRTIs represents the mainstay of management for mitochondrial toxicity and its clinical manifestations. A range of pharmacological approaches has been proposed as treatments and prophylaxes.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC.-
dc.relation.ispartofAdvances in experimental medicine and biologyen_HK
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com-
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshMitochondrial Diseases - chemically induced - metabolism - prevention and controlen_HK
dc.subject.meshReactive Oxygen Species - metabolismen_HK
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_HK
dc.titleIatrogenic mitochondriopathies: a recent lesson from nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitorsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GPH: gphleung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GPH=rp00234en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-94-007-2869-1_16en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22399431-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84859926207en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros203463en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84859926207&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume942en_HK
dc.identifier.spage347en_HK
dc.identifier.epage369en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000333840200017-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GPH=35963668200en_HK

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