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Article: Metabolism of calycosin, an isoflavone from Astragali Radix, in zebrafish larvae
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TitleMetabolism of calycosin, an isoflavone from Astragali Radix, in zebrafish larvae
 
AuthorsHu, G2
Siu, SO2 1
Li, S2
Chu, IK1
Kwan, YW4
Chan, SW3
Leung, GPH1
Yan, R2
Lee, SMY2
 
KeywordsCalycosin
Conjugation
Isoflavone
Metabolism
Zebrafish larvae
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00498254.asp
 
CitationXenobiotica, 2012, v. 42 n. 3, p. 294-303 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00498254.2011.617015
 
AbstractAlthough zebrafish has become a popular animal model for drug discovery and screening, drug metabolism in zebrafish remains largely unknown. In this study, we probed the metabolic capability of zebrafish larvae with calycosin, one of the major isoflavone constituents of Radix Astragali that was previously demonstrated to be angiogenic in the zebrafish model. The metabolism of calycosin and accumulation of its metabolites in zebrafish larvae were determined using an LCMS/MS method. Calycosin showed a slow but steady decrease from the culture medium as well as a steady accumulation in zebrafish larvae. Calycosin underwent major conjugation and minor oxidation in zebrafish larvae. A total of ten calycosin metabolites formed from glucuronidation, glucosylation, sulfation, oxidation or a combination of two of these metabolisms were identified, most of which were reported for the first time. Most metabolites increased steadily in the larvae over 24-h experimental period. The dominant phase II conjugation of calycosin in zebrafish larvae matched well with existing knowledge of isoflavone metabolism in mammalians. The findings shed a light in certain degree of similarity of phase II drug metabolism between zebrafish larvae and mammals and warrant further investigation on feasibility of adopting the zebrafish larvae as a whole-organism model for examining drug metabolism. © 2012 Informa UK, Ltd.
 
ISSN0049-8254
2013 Impact Factor: 2.101
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00498254.2011.617015
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000299696900007
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorHu, G
 
dc.contributor.authorSiu, SO
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, S
 
dc.contributor.authorChu, IK
 
dc.contributor.authorKwan, YW
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, SW
 
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GPH
 
dc.contributor.authorYan, R
 
dc.contributor.authorLee, SMY
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T05:56:14Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-16T05:56:14Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractAlthough zebrafish has become a popular animal model for drug discovery and screening, drug metabolism in zebrafish remains largely unknown. In this study, we probed the metabolic capability of zebrafish larvae with calycosin, one of the major isoflavone constituents of Radix Astragali that was previously demonstrated to be angiogenic in the zebrafish model. The metabolism of calycosin and accumulation of its metabolites in zebrafish larvae were determined using an LCMS/MS method. Calycosin showed a slow but steady decrease from the culture medium as well as a steady accumulation in zebrafish larvae. Calycosin underwent major conjugation and minor oxidation in zebrafish larvae. A total of ten calycosin metabolites formed from glucuronidation, glucosylation, sulfation, oxidation or a combination of two of these metabolisms were identified, most of which were reported for the first time. Most metabolites increased steadily in the larvae over 24-h experimental period. The dominant phase II conjugation of calycosin in zebrafish larvae matched well with existing knowledge of isoflavone metabolism in mammalians. The findings shed a light in certain degree of similarity of phase II drug metabolism between zebrafish larvae and mammals and warrant further investigation on feasibility of adopting the zebrafish larvae as a whole-organism model for examining drug metabolism. © 2012 Informa UK, Ltd.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationXenobiotica, 2012, v. 42 n. 3, p. 294-303 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00498254.2011.617015
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00498254.2011.617015
 
dc.identifier.epage303
 
dc.identifier.hkuros203462
 
dc.identifier.hkuros204648
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000299696900007
 
dc.identifier.issn0049-8254
2013 Impact Factor: 2.101
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.pmid21961561
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84863061192
 
dc.identifier.spage294
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159770
 
dc.identifier.volume42
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00498254.asp
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofXenobiotica
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectCalycosin
 
dc.subjectConjugation
 
dc.subjectIsoflavone
 
dc.subjectMetabolism
 
dc.subjectZebrafish larvae
 
dc.titleMetabolism of calycosin, an isoflavone from Astragali Radix, in zebrafish larvae
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Kwan, YW</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chan, SW</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Leung, GPH</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>Although zebrafish has become a popular animal model for drug discovery and screening, drug metabolism in zebrafish remains largely unknown. In this study, we probed the metabolic capability of zebrafish larvae with calycosin, one of the major isoflavone constituents of Radix Astragali that was previously demonstrated to be angiogenic in the zebrafish model. The metabolism of calycosin and accumulation of its metabolites in zebrafish larvae were determined using an LCMS/MS method. Calycosin showed a slow but steady decrease from the culture medium as well as a steady accumulation in zebrafish larvae. Calycosin underwent major conjugation and minor oxidation in zebrafish larvae. A total of ten calycosin metabolites formed from glucuronidation, glucosylation, sulfation, oxidation or a combination of two of these metabolisms were identified, most of which were reported for the first time. Most metabolites increased steadily in the larvae over 24-h experimental period. The dominant phase II conjugation of calycosin in zebrafish larvae matched well with existing knowledge of isoflavone metabolism in mammalians. The findings shed a light in certain degree of similarity of phase II drug metabolism between zebrafish larvae and mammals and warrant further investigation on feasibility of adopting the zebrafish larvae as a whole-organism model for examining drug metabolism. &#169; 2012 Informa UK, Ltd.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. University of Macau
  3. Hong Kong Polytechnic University
  4. Chinese University of Hong Kong