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Article: Is human cytomegalovirus infection associated with hypertension? the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002
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TitleIs human cytomegalovirus infection associated with hypertension? the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002
 
AuthorsLi, C1
Samaranayake, N
Ong, KL2
Wong, HK1
Cheung, BMY1
 
KeywordsBody mass
Cytomegalovirus infection
Diabetes mellitus
Disease association
Ethnic difference
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
 
CitationPLoS One, 2012, v. 7 n. 7, article no. e39760 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0039760
 
AbstractPURPOSE: Recent studies have implicated the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) as a possible pathogen for causing hypertension. We aimed to study the association between HCMV infection and hypertension in the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). METHODS: We analyzed data on 2979 men and 3324 women in the NHANES 1999-2002. We included participants aged 16-49 years who had valid data on HCMV infection and hypertension. RESULTS: Of the participants, 54.7% had serologic evidence of HCMV infection and 17.5% had hypertension. There were ethnic differences in the prevalence of HCMV infection (P<0.001) and hypertension (P<0.001). The prevalence of both increased with age (P<0.001). Before adjustment, HCMV seropositivity was significantly associated with hypertension in women (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.25-2.13, P = 0.001) but not in men. After adjustment for race/ethnicity, the association between HCMV seropositivity and hypertension in women remained significant (OR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.20-2.02, P = 0.002). Further adjustment for body mass index, diabetes status and hypercholesterolemia attenuated the association (OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.10-1.90, P = 0.010). However, after adjusting for age, the association was no longer significant (OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 0.91-1.67, P = 0.162). CONCLUSIONS: In this nationally representative population-based survey, HCMV seropositivity is associated with hypertension in women in the NHANES population. This association is largely explained by the association of hypertension with age and the increase in past exposure to HCMV with age.
 
ISSN1932-6203
2013 Impact Factor: 3.534
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.724
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0039760
 
PubMed Central IDPMC3388091
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000305966500024
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLi, C
 
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, N
 
dc.contributor.authorOng, KL
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, HK
 
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BMY
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T05:53:50Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-16T05:53:50Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Recent studies have implicated the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) as a possible pathogen for causing hypertension. We aimed to study the association between HCMV infection and hypertension in the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). METHODS: We analyzed data on 2979 men and 3324 women in the NHANES 1999-2002. We included participants aged 16-49 years who had valid data on HCMV infection and hypertension. RESULTS: Of the participants, 54.7% had serologic evidence of HCMV infection and 17.5% had hypertension. There were ethnic differences in the prevalence of HCMV infection (P<0.001) and hypertension (P<0.001). The prevalence of both increased with age (P<0.001). Before adjustment, HCMV seropositivity was significantly associated with hypertension in women (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.25-2.13, P = 0.001) but not in men. After adjustment for race/ethnicity, the association between HCMV seropositivity and hypertension in women remained significant (OR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.20-2.02, P = 0.002). Further adjustment for body mass index, diabetes status and hypercholesterolemia attenuated the association (OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.10-1.90, P = 0.010). However, after adjusting for age, the association was no longer significant (OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 0.91-1.67, P = 0.162). CONCLUSIONS: In this nationally representative population-based survey, HCMV seropositivity is associated with hypertension in women in the NHANES population. This association is largely explained by the association of hypertension with age and the increase in past exposure to HCMV with age.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One, 2012, v. 7 n. 7, article no. e39760 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0039760
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0039760
 
dc.identifier.hkuros204106
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000305966500024
 
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
2013 Impact Factor: 3.534
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.724
 
dc.identifier.issue7, article no. e39760
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3388091
 
dc.identifier.pmid22768311
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84863621393
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159662
 
dc.identifier.volume7
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS One
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subjectBody mass
 
dc.subjectCytomegalovirus infection
 
dc.subjectDiabetes mellitus
 
dc.subjectDisease association
 
dc.subjectEthnic difference
 
dc.titleIs human cytomegalovirus infection associated with hypertension? the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Samaranayake, N</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ong, KL</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wong, HK</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Cheung, BMY</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2012-08-16T05:53:50Z</date.accessioned>
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<description.abstract>PURPOSE: Recent studies have implicated the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) as a possible pathogen for causing hypertension. We aimed to study the association between HCMV infection and hypertension in the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). METHODS: We analyzed data on 2979 men and 3324 women in the NHANES 1999-2002. We included participants aged 16-49 years who had valid data on HCMV infection and hypertension. RESULTS: Of the participants, 54.7% had serologic evidence of HCMV infection and 17.5% had hypertension. There were ethnic differences in the prevalence of HCMV infection (P&lt;0.001) and hypertension (P&lt;0.001). The prevalence of both increased with age (P&lt;0.001). Before adjustment, HCMV seropositivity was significantly associated with hypertension in women (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.25-2.13, P = 0.001) but not in men. After adjustment for race/ethnicity, the association between HCMV seropositivity and hypertension in women remained significant (OR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.20-2.02, P = 0.002). Further adjustment for body mass index, diabetes status and hypercholesterolemia attenuated the association (OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.10-1.90, P = 0.010). However, after adjusting for age, the association was no longer significant (OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 0.91-1.67, P = 0.162). CONCLUSIONS: In this nationally representative population-based survey, HCMV seropositivity is associated with hypertension in women in the NHANES population. This association is largely explained by the association of hypertension with age and the increase in past exposure to HCMV with age.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Heart Research Institute Australia