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Article: Dense cranial electroacupuncture stimulation for major depressive disorder-A single-blind, randomized, controlled study
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TitleDense cranial electroacupuncture stimulation for major depressive disorder-A single-blind, randomized, controlled study
 
AuthorsZhang, ZJ1
Ng, R1
Man, SC1
Li, TYJ1
Wong, W1
Tan, QR3
Wong, HK1
Chung, KF1
Wong, MT4
Tsang, WKA4
Yip, Kc4
Ziea, E2
Wong, VT2
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
 
CitationPlos One, 2012, v. 7 n. 1 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0029651
 
AbstractBackground: Previous studies suggest that electroacupuncture possesses therapeutic benefits for depressive disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine whether dense cranial electroacupuncture stimulation (DCEAS) could enhance the antidepressant efficacy in the early phase of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods: In this single-blind, randomized, controlled study, patients with MDD were randomly assigned to 9-session DCEAS or noninvasive electroacupuncture (n-EA) control procedure in combination with fluoxetine (FLX) for 3 weeks. Clinical outcomes were measured using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17), Clinical Global Impression-severity (CGI-S), and Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS) as well as the response and remission rates. Results: Seventy-three patients were randomly assigned to n-EA (n = 35) and DCEAS (n = 38), of whom 34 in n-EA and 36 in DCEAS group were analyzed. DCEAS-treated patients displayed a significantly greater reduction from baseline in HAMD-17 scores at Day 3 through Day 21 and in SDS scores at Day 3 and Day 21 compared to patients receiving n-EA. DCEAS intervention also produced a higher rate of clinically significant response compared to n-EA procedure (19.4% (7/36) vs. 8.8% (3/34)). The incidence of adverse events was similar in the two groups. Conclusions: DCEAS is a safe and effective intervention that augments the antidepressant efficacy. It can be considered as an additional therapy in the early phase of SSRI treatment of depressed patients. © 2012 Zhang et al.
 
ISSN1932-6203
2012 Impact Factor: 3.73
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.512
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0029651
 
PubMed Central IDPMC3253099
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorZhang, ZJ
 
dc.contributor.authorNg, R
 
dc.contributor.authorMan, SC
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, TYJ
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, W
 
dc.contributor.authorTan, QR
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, HK
 
dc.contributor.authorChung, KF
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, MT
 
dc.contributor.authorTsang, WKA
 
dc.contributor.authorYip, Kc
 
dc.contributor.authorZiea, E
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, VT
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T05:53:08Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-16T05:53:08Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: Previous studies suggest that electroacupuncture possesses therapeutic benefits for depressive disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine whether dense cranial electroacupuncture stimulation (DCEAS) could enhance the antidepressant efficacy in the early phase of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods: In this single-blind, randomized, controlled study, patients with MDD were randomly assigned to 9-session DCEAS or noninvasive electroacupuncture (n-EA) control procedure in combination with fluoxetine (FLX) for 3 weeks. Clinical outcomes were measured using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17), Clinical Global Impression-severity (CGI-S), and Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS) as well as the response and remission rates. Results: Seventy-three patients were randomly assigned to n-EA (n = 35) and DCEAS (n = 38), of whom 34 in n-EA and 36 in DCEAS group were analyzed. DCEAS-treated patients displayed a significantly greater reduction from baseline in HAMD-17 scores at Day 3 through Day 21 and in SDS scores at Day 3 and Day 21 compared to patients receiving n-EA. DCEAS intervention also produced a higher rate of clinically significant response compared to n-EA procedure (19.4% (7/36) vs. 8.8% (3/34)). The incidence of adverse events was similar in the two groups. Conclusions: DCEAS is a safe and effective intervention that augments the antidepressant efficacy. It can be considered as an additional therapy in the early phase of SSRI treatment of depressed patients. © 2012 Zhang et al.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.identifier.citationPlos One, 2012, v. 7 n. 1 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0029651
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0029651
 
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203
 
dc.identifier.hkuros205006
 
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
2012 Impact Factor: 3.73
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.512
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3253099
 
dc.identifier.pmid22238631
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84855456776
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159605
 
dc.identifier.volume7
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONE
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subject.meshAntidepressive Agents, Second-Generation - administration and dosage
 
dc.subject.meshCombined Modality Therapy
 
dc.subject.meshDepressive Disorder, Major - therapy
 
dc.subject.meshElectroacupuncture - methods
 
dc.subject.meshElectroconvulsive Therapy - methods
 
dc.titleDense cranial electroacupuncture stimulation for major depressive disorder-A single-blind, randomized, controlled study
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Tan, QR</contributor.author>
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<contributor.author>Ziea, E</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine
  2. Hong Kong Hospital Authority
  3. The Fourth Military Medical University
  4. Kowloon Hospital