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Article: Regional blocks in orthopaedics

TitleRegional blocks in orthopaedics
Authors
KeywordsCatheter
Neuraxial block
Peripheral nerve block
Regional anaesthesia
Ultrasound guidance
Issue Date2012
PublisherThe Medicine Publishing Company. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.medicinepublishing.co.uk/index.php/anaesthesia/
Citation
Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, 2012, v. 13 n. 3, p. 89-93 How to Cite?
AbstractEffective postoperative pain management plays a significant role in decreasing hospital stay and has a positive effect on functional recovery and patient satisfaction. Orthopaedic surgery is an expanding surgical specialty with a potentially difficult patient population. Regional anaesthesia is becoming increasingly popular as it offers several advantages over general anaesthesia. The aim of analgesic protocols is not only to reduce pain intensity but also to decrease the incidence of side effects from analgesic agents and to improve patient comfort. Moreover, adequate pain control is a prerequisite for rehabilitation programmes to accelerate functional recovery and may have economic benefits. Recently there has been resurgence in the use of regional anaesthesia with advanced techniques for nerve localization and visualization of needle and local anaesthetic spread. The use of peripheral nerve blocks has been associated with earlier discharge in ambulatory orthopaedic surgery when compared to general anaesthesia and neuraxial blockade. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159247
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.124

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, CWWen_US
dc.contributor.authorIrwin, MGen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T05:47:10Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-16T05:47:10Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationAnaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, 2012, v. 13 n. 3, p. 89-93en_US
dc.identifier.issn1472-0299-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159247-
dc.description.abstractEffective postoperative pain management plays a significant role in decreasing hospital stay and has a positive effect on functional recovery and patient satisfaction. Orthopaedic surgery is an expanding surgical specialty with a potentially difficult patient population. Regional anaesthesia is becoming increasingly popular as it offers several advantages over general anaesthesia. The aim of analgesic protocols is not only to reduce pain intensity but also to decrease the incidence of side effects from analgesic agents and to improve patient comfort. Moreover, adequate pain control is a prerequisite for rehabilitation programmes to accelerate functional recovery and may have economic benefits. Recently there has been resurgence in the use of regional anaesthesia with advanced techniques for nerve localization and visualization of needle and local anaesthetic spread. The use of peripheral nerve blocks has been associated with earlier discharge in ambulatory orthopaedic surgery when compared to general anaesthesia and neuraxial blockade. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe Medicine Publishing Company. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.medicinepublishing.co.uk/index.php/anaesthesia/-
dc.relation.ispartofAnaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicineen_US
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com-
dc.subjectCatheter-
dc.subjectNeuraxial block-
dc.subjectPeripheral nerve block-
dc.subjectRegional anaesthesia-
dc.subjectUltrasound guidance-
dc.titleRegional blocks in orthopaedicsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailIrwin, MG: mgirwin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityIrwin, MG=rp00390en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.mpaic.2011.12.004-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84858011955-
dc.identifier.hkuros203051en_US
dc.identifier.volume13en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage89en_US
dc.identifier.epage93en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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