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Article: Anaesthesia and minimally invasive surgery

TitleAnaesthesia and minimally invasive surgery
Authors
KeywordsAnaesthesia
complications
laparoscopy
laryngeal mask airway
minimally invasive surgery
pathophysiological changes
pneumoperitoeum
regional
supraglottic airway device
Trendelenburg
Issue Date2012
PublisherThe Medicine Publishing Company. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.anaesthesiajournal.co.uk/
Citation
Anaesthesia And Intensive Care Medicine, 2012, v. 13 n. 2, p. 48-51 How to Cite?
AbstractMinimally invasive surgery is commonly performed because of various advantages such as reduced postoperative pain, faster recovery, and reduced postoperative pulmonary complications. However, anaesthesia for laparoscopy can be difficult and potentially hazardous in long, complex surgical procedures and in sick patients. Establishment of CO 2 pneumoperitoneum produces adverse pathophysiological changes due to increased intra-abdominal pressure and hypercapnia, and these are further altered by postural changes. Laparoscopy is also associated with potential complications such as extraperitoneal gas insufflation and pneumothorax. It is important for the anaesthetist to understand the advantages and potential risks. General anaesthesia with endotracheal intubation is the most common anaesthetic technique, but supraglottic airway devices can sometimes be used. Neuroaxial anaesthesia has been used in some laparoscopic procedures as the sole anaesthetic technique. This article will focus on the pathophysiological changes caused by CO 2 pneumoperitoneum, the anaesthetic management for patients undergoing laparoscopy, and potential complications. © 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159245
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.124
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorIrwin, MGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, SSCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T05:47:10Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-16T05:47:10Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAnaesthesia And Intensive Care Medicine, 2012, v. 13 n. 2, p. 48-51en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1472-0299en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159245-
dc.description.abstractMinimally invasive surgery is commonly performed because of various advantages such as reduced postoperative pain, faster recovery, and reduced postoperative pulmonary complications. However, anaesthesia for laparoscopy can be difficult and potentially hazardous in long, complex surgical procedures and in sick patients. Establishment of CO 2 pneumoperitoneum produces adverse pathophysiological changes due to increased intra-abdominal pressure and hypercapnia, and these are further altered by postural changes. Laparoscopy is also associated with potential complications such as extraperitoneal gas insufflation and pneumothorax. It is important for the anaesthetist to understand the advantages and potential risks. General anaesthesia with endotracheal intubation is the most common anaesthetic technique, but supraglottic airway devices can sometimes be used. Neuroaxial anaesthesia has been used in some laparoscopic procedures as the sole anaesthetic technique. This article will focus on the pathophysiological changes caused by CO 2 pneumoperitoneum, the anaesthetic management for patients undergoing laparoscopy, and potential complications. © 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe Medicine Publishing Company. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.anaesthesiajournal.co.uk/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAnaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicineen_HK
dc.subjectAnaesthesiaen_HK
dc.subjectcomplicationsen_HK
dc.subjectlaparoscopyen_HK
dc.subjectlaryngeal mask airwayen_HK
dc.subjectminimally invasive surgeryen_HK
dc.subjectpathophysiological changesen_HK
dc.subjectpneumoperitoeumen_HK
dc.subjectregionalen_HK
dc.subjectsupraglottic airway deviceen_HK
dc.subjectTrendelenburgen_HK
dc.titleAnaesthesia and minimally invasive surgeryen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailIrwin, MG: mgirwin@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, SSC: wongstan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityIrwin, MG=rp00390en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, SSC=rp01789en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.mpaic.2011.11.004en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84856888741en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros203049en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84856888741&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume13en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage48en_HK
dc.identifier.epage51en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridIrwin, MG=7202411076en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, SSC=55451180900en_HK

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