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Article: Family structure, parent-child conversation time and substance use among Chinese adolescents

TitleFamily structure, parent-child conversation time and substance use among Chinese adolescents
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpublichealth/
Citation
BMC Public Health, 2010, v. 10, article no. 503 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: The family plays a vital role in shaping adolescent behaviours. The present study investigated the associations between family structure and substance use among Hong Kong Chinese adolescents. METHODS: A total of 32,961 Form 1 to 5 (grade 7-12 in the US) Hong Kong students participated in the Youth Smoking Survey in 2003-4. An anonymous questionnaire was used to obtain information about family structure, daily duration of parent-child conversation, smoking, alcohol drinking and drug use. Logistic regression was used to calculate the adjusted odds ratios (OR) for each substance use by family structure. RESULTS: Adjusting for sex, age, type of housing, parental smoking and school, adolescents from non-intact families were significantly more likely to be current smokers (OR = 1.62), weekly drinkers (OR = 1.72) and ever drug users (OR = 1.72), with significant linear increases in ORs from maternal, paternal to no-parent families compared with intact families. Furthermore, current smoking (OR = 1.41) and weekly drinking (OR = 1.46) were significantly more common among adolescents from paternal than maternal families. After adjusting for parent-child conversation time, the ORs for non-intact families remained significant compared with intact families, but the paternal-maternal differences were no longer significant. CONCLUSIONS: Non-intact families were associated with substance use among Hong Kong Chinese adolescents. The apparently stronger associations with substance use in paternal than maternal families were probably mediated by the poorer communication with the father.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159190
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.209
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.372
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Department of Health
Hong Kong Council on Smoking and Health
Funding Information:

We would like to thank MK Lai for his contribution in project coordination, and the Department of Health and the Hong Kong Council on Smoking and Health for funding.

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMak, KK-
dc.contributor.authorHo, SY-
dc.contributor.authorThomas, GN-
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CM-
dc.contributor.authorMcGhee, SM-
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH-
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-15T08:38:21Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-15T08:38:21Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationBMC Public Health, 2010, v. 10, article no. 503-
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159190-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The family plays a vital role in shaping adolescent behaviours. The present study investigated the associations between family structure and substance use among Hong Kong Chinese adolescents. METHODS: A total of 32,961 Form 1 to 5 (grade 7-12 in the US) Hong Kong students participated in the Youth Smoking Survey in 2003-4. An anonymous questionnaire was used to obtain information about family structure, daily duration of parent-child conversation, smoking, alcohol drinking and drug use. Logistic regression was used to calculate the adjusted odds ratios (OR) for each substance use by family structure. RESULTS: Adjusting for sex, age, type of housing, parental smoking and school, adolescents from non-intact families were significantly more likely to be current smokers (OR = 1.62), weekly drinkers (OR = 1.72) and ever drug users (OR = 1.72), with significant linear increases in ORs from maternal, paternal to no-parent families compared with intact families. Furthermore, current smoking (OR = 1.41) and weekly drinking (OR = 1.46) were significantly more common among adolescents from paternal than maternal families. After adjusting for parent-child conversation time, the ORs for non-intact families remained significant compared with intact families, but the paternal-maternal differences were no longer significant. CONCLUSIONS: Non-intact families were associated with substance use among Hong Kong Chinese adolescents. The apparently stronger associations with substance use in paternal than maternal families were probably mediated by the poorer communication with the father.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpublichealth/-
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Public Health-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsB M C Public Health. Copyright © BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.subject.meshAdolescent Behavior - psychology-
dc.subject.meshAlcohol Drinking - psychology-
dc.subject.meshFamily Characteristics-
dc.subject.meshSmoking - epidemiology - psychology-
dc.subject.meshSubstance-Related Disorders - psychology-
dc.titleFamily structure, parent-child conversation time and substance use among Chinese adolescentsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMak, KK: kkmak@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHo, SY: syho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailMcGhee, SM: smmcghee@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2458-10-503-
dc.identifier.pmid20723230-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2931477-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77955705493-
dc.identifier.hkuros183764-
dc.identifier.hkuros180131-
dc.identifier.volume10, article no. 503-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000282237400004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMak, KK=19934230600-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, SY=7403716884-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomas, GN=35465269900-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcGhee, SM=7003288588-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876-

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