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Article: Impulsivity and pathological gambling among Chinese: is it a state or a trait problem?

TitleImpulsivity and pathological gambling among Chinese: is it a state or a trait problem?
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcresnotes/
Citation
BMC Research Notes, 2011, v. 4, article no. 492 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: This study tested 37 Chinese male pathological gamblers and 40 controls to understand the relationship between pathological gambling and impulsivity as a long-term trait or a short-term state in the cognitive and affective domain. RESULTS: Trait impulsivity was measured by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11. State impulsivity in the cognitive and affective domains were measured by the Stroop Color Word Test and the Emotional Conflict Task, respectively. The pathological gamblers scored significantly higher than the controls on the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11. However, there were no significant group differences in performance on the Stroop Color Word Test or the Emotional Conflict Task. CONCLUSIONS: Findings clearly show that pathological gambling is associated with trait but not state impulsivity. In other words, pathological gambling is associated with an impulsivity stemming from enduring personality characteristics that lead gamblers to focus on short-term gains (trait impulsivity) rather than momentary cognitive or affective disinhibition (state impulsivity). Interventions should aim to change pathological gamblers' habitual functioning style by cultivating healthy reflection habits and focusing on long-term rewards.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159187
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.702
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLai, FDM-
dc.contributor.authorIp, AKY-
dc.contributor.authorLee, TMC-
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-15T00:37:37Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-15T00:37:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationBMC Research Notes, 2011, v. 4, article no. 492-
dc.identifier.issn1756-0500-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159187-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: This study tested 37 Chinese male pathological gamblers and 40 controls to understand the relationship between pathological gambling and impulsivity as a long-term trait or a short-term state in the cognitive and affective domain. RESULTS: Trait impulsivity was measured by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11. State impulsivity in the cognitive and affective domains were measured by the Stroop Color Word Test and the Emotional Conflict Task, respectively. The pathological gamblers scored significantly higher than the controls on the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11. However, there were no significant group differences in performance on the Stroop Color Word Test or the Emotional Conflict Task. CONCLUSIONS: Findings clearly show that pathological gambling is associated with trait but not state impulsivity. In other words, pathological gambling is associated with an impulsivity stemming from enduring personality characteristics that lead gamblers to focus on short-term gains (trait impulsivity) rather than momentary cognitive or affective disinhibition (state impulsivity). Interventions should aim to change pathological gamblers' habitual functioning style by cultivating healthy reflection habits and focusing on long-term rewards.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcresnotes/-
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Research Notes-
dc.rightsBMC Research Notes. Copyright © BioMed Central Ltd..-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleImpulsivity and pathological gambling among Chinese: is it a state or a trait problem?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, TMC: tmclee@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1756-0500-4-492-
dc.identifier.pmid22078160-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3262804-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-81055124213-
dc.identifier.hkuros204187-
dc.identifier.volume4, article no. 492-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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