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Conference Paper: Too much or too little: visual considerations of public engagement tools in environment impact assessments

TitleToo much or too little: visual considerations of public engagement tools in environment impact assessments
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.com/content/105633/
Citation
The 8th International Conference on Visual Information and Information Systems (VISUAL 2005), Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 5 July 2005. In Lecture Notes In Computer Science, 2005, v. 3736, p. 189-202 How to Cite?
AbstractRecently proposed reclamation works due to take place in the Victoria Harbor of Hong Kong have raised questions about their appropriateness and desirability. Although the plans for reclamation had gone through the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) process and the submitted report available online, its wordy and technical contents were not well received by the public. The report failed to offer the community at large a better understanding of the issues at hand and to visualize what would become of the proposed site upon project completion. Henceforth, the Environmental Protection Department stipulates that future EIA reports be presented in a format more readily comprehensible than written accounts. This requirement calls for more visual displays, including but not limited to, three dimensional models, maps and photo imageries. In compliance with the requirements and recognizing technological impetus, we structured a web-based platform that makes use of the Geographic Information System technology to explore alternative visual presentation, such as maps, graphics, photos, videos, and animations. Our research has demonstrated that visual resources are viable substitutes to written statements in conveying environmental problems albeit with limitations. This paper shares our knowledge and experience in compiling visual resources and hopes that our integrative effort is a step forward in the development of a more effective public engagement tool. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159110
ISBN
ISSN
2005 Impact Factor: 0.402
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.252
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMak, ASHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLai, PCen_US
dc.contributor.authorKwong, RKHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, STSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T09:08:03Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T09:08:03Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 8th International Conference on Visual Information and Information Systems (VISUAL 2005), Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 5 July 2005. In Lecture Notes In Computer Science, 2005, v. 3736, p. 189-202en_US
dc.identifier.isbn978-354030488-3-
dc.identifier.issn0302-9743en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159110-
dc.description.abstractRecently proposed reclamation works due to take place in the Victoria Harbor of Hong Kong have raised questions about their appropriateness and desirability. Although the plans for reclamation had gone through the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) process and the submitted report available online, its wordy and technical contents were not well received by the public. The report failed to offer the community at large a better understanding of the issues at hand and to visualize what would become of the proposed site upon project completion. Henceforth, the Environmental Protection Department stipulates that future EIA reports be presented in a format more readily comprehensible than written accounts. This requirement calls for more visual displays, including but not limited to, three dimensional models, maps and photo imageries. In compliance with the requirements and recognizing technological impetus, we structured a web-based platform that makes use of the Geographic Information System technology to explore alternative visual presentation, such as maps, graphics, photos, videos, and animations. Our research has demonstrated that visual resources are viable substitutes to written statements in conveying environmental problems albeit with limitations. This paper shares our knowledge and experience in compiling visual resources and hopes that our integrative effort is a step forward in the development of a more effective public engagement tool. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.com/content/105633/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofLecture Notes in Computer Scienceen_US
dc.titleToo much or too little: visual considerations of public engagement tools in environment impact assessmentsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLai, PC: pclai@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLai, PC=rp00565en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33646556670en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros111190-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33646556670&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume3736en_US
dc.identifier.spage189en_US
dc.identifier.epage202en_US
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMak, ASH=11338990100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, PC=7202946446en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwong, RKH=13411084300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, STS=13410331600en_US
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 160224 - merged-

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