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Conference Paper: Neural correlates of nouns and verbs in early bilinguals

TitleNeural correlates of nouns and verbs in early bilinguals
Authors
KeywordsBilingualism
Cerebellum
Chinese-English bilinguals
fMRI
Language
Nouns and verbs
Putamen
Reading
Issue Date2008
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0077-8923&site=1
Citation
Annals Of The New York Academy Of Sciences, 2008, v. 1145, p. 30-40 How to Cite?
AbstractPrevious neuroimaging research indicates that English verbs and nouns are represented in frontal and posterior brain regions, respectively. For Chinese monolinguals, however, nouns and verbs are found to be associated with a wide range of overlapping areas without significant differences in neural signatures. This different pattern of findings led us to ask the question of where nouns and verbs of two different languages are represented in various areas in the brain in Chinese-English bilinguals. In this study, we utilized functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a lexical decision paradigm involving Chinese and English verbs and nouns to address this question. We found that while Chinese nouns and verbs involved activation of common brain areas, the processing of English verbs engaged many more regions than did the processing of English nouns. Specifically, compared to English nouns, English verb presentation was associated with stronger activation of the left putamen and cerebellum, which are responsible for motor function, suggesting the involvement of the motor system in the processing of English verbs. Our findings are consistent with the theory that neural circuits for linguistic dimensions are weighted and modulated by the characteristics of a language. © 2008 New York Academy of Sciences.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159069
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.518
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.389
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Research Grants CouncilHKU 7275/03H
University of Hong Kong200607176135
Ministry of Science and Technology of China2005CB522802
Funding Information:

This research was supported by the Hong Kong Research Grants Council Grant HKU 7275/03H (to L.H.T), the University of Hong Kong Grant 200607176135 (to A.C.), and a 973 Grant (2005CB522802) from the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (to L.H.T).

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, AHDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLuke, KKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYip, Ven_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWeekes, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorTan, LHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T09:06:27Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T09:06:27Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAnnals Of The New York Academy Of Sciences, 2008, v. 1145, p. 30-40en_US
dc.identifier.issn0077-8923en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/159069-
dc.description.abstractPrevious neuroimaging research indicates that English verbs and nouns are represented in frontal and posterior brain regions, respectively. For Chinese monolinguals, however, nouns and verbs are found to be associated with a wide range of overlapping areas without significant differences in neural signatures. This different pattern of findings led us to ask the question of where nouns and verbs of two different languages are represented in various areas in the brain in Chinese-English bilinguals. In this study, we utilized functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a lexical decision paradigm involving Chinese and English verbs and nouns to address this question. We found that while Chinese nouns and verbs involved activation of common brain areas, the processing of English verbs engaged many more regions than did the processing of English nouns. Specifically, compared to English nouns, English verb presentation was associated with stronger activation of the left putamen and cerebellum, which are responsible for motor function, suggesting the involvement of the motor system in the processing of English verbs. Our findings are consistent with the theory that neural circuits for linguistic dimensions are weighted and modulated by the characteristics of a language. © 2008 New York Academy of Sciences.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0077-8923&site=1en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciencesen_HK
dc.subjectBilingualismen_HK
dc.subjectCerebellumen_HK
dc.subjectChinese-English bilingualsen_HK
dc.subjectfMRIen_HK
dc.subjectLanguageen_HK
dc.subjectNouns and verbsen_HK
dc.subjectPutamenen_HK
dc.subjectReadingen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBrain - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imagingen_US
dc.subject.meshMultilingualismen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.titleNeural correlates of nouns and verbs in early bilingualsen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLuke, KK: kkluke@hkusua.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWeekes, B: weekes@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTan, LH: tanlh@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLuke, KK=rp01201en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWeekes, B=rp01390en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTan, LH=rp01202en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1196/annals.1416.000en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19076387-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-57449092098en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros132148-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-57449092098&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume1145en_HK
dc.identifier.spage30en_HK
dc.identifier.epage40en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1749-6632-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000262097100003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.relation.projectAge of acquisition and language processing: cognitive and brain-mapping studies-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, AHD=23766960600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLuke, KK=7003697439en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, P=16032736200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, V=16246810500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, G=35767974200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWeekes, B=6701924212en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTan, LH=7402233462en_HK

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