File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Conference Paper: Time-resolved microscale temperature measurements of high-power semiconductor lasers

TitleTime-resolved microscale temperature measurements of high-power semiconductor lasers
Authors
Issue Date2005
Citation
American Society Of Mechanical Engineers, Heat Transfer Division, (Publication) Htd, 2005, v. 376 HTD n. 1, p. 657-662 How to Cite?
AbstractNonradiative recombination and other heat generation processes affect both the performance and lifetime characteristics of semiconductor diode lasers. This is especially true for high-power devices, where facet heating due to nonradiative recombination can lead to catastrophic optical damage (COD). Here we present for the first time temperature measurements of a semiconductor laser in which the surface temperature profile (and hence the current density profile) of the laser is measured as it evolves in time. The laser studied is a λ=1.55μm 1-cm-long InGaAsP/InP watt-class slab-coupled optical waveguide laser (SCOWL). The ridge width of the SCOWLs examined here is approximately 5 μm. Temperature measurements are taken using multiple microthermocouples with sizes less than 20μm. Surface temperature fluctuations in time are seen to be quite large, as high as 20% of the total temperature increase of the device. Time-resolved measurements allow us to see both positive correlation (in which the temperature rises at the same time across an area of the device) as well as negative correlation (in which part of the device gets hot at the same time as another part of the device gets cold). Negative correlations are likely due to facet heating processes which cause bandgap shrinkage and hence increased current flow to a facet, pulling current away from the center of the device. Time-resolved measurements of the surface temperature profile therefore show promise as a non-destructive method for characterizing the failure mechanisms of a laser, as facet damage over time is otherwise very difficult to measure before the COD runaway process destroys the device. Copyright © 2005 by ASME.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/158959
ISSN
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, PKLen_US
dc.contributor.authorSathe, ADen_US
dc.contributor.authorPipe, KPen_US
dc.contributor.authorPlant, JJen_US
dc.contributor.authorJuodawlkis, PWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T09:04:47Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T09:04:47Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Society Of Mechanical Engineers, Heat Transfer Division, (Publication) Htd, 2005, v. 376 HTD n. 1, p. 657-662en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-5673en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/158959-
dc.description.abstractNonradiative recombination and other heat generation processes affect both the performance and lifetime characteristics of semiconductor diode lasers. This is especially true for high-power devices, where facet heating due to nonradiative recombination can lead to catastrophic optical damage (COD). Here we present for the first time temperature measurements of a semiconductor laser in which the surface temperature profile (and hence the current density profile) of the laser is measured as it evolves in time. The laser studied is a λ=1.55μm 1-cm-long InGaAsP/InP watt-class slab-coupled optical waveguide laser (SCOWL). The ridge width of the SCOWLs examined here is approximately 5 μm. Temperature measurements are taken using multiple microthermocouples with sizes less than 20μm. Surface temperature fluctuations in time are seen to be quite large, as high as 20% of the total temperature increase of the device. Time-resolved measurements allow us to see both positive correlation (in which the temperature rises at the same time across an area of the device) as well as negative correlation (in which part of the device gets hot at the same time as another part of the device gets cold). Negative correlations are likely due to facet heating processes which cause bandgap shrinkage and hence increased current flow to a facet, pulling current away from the center of the device. Time-resolved measurements of the surface temperature profile therefore show promise as a non-destructive method for characterizing the failure mechanisms of a laser, as facet damage over time is otherwise very difficult to measure before the COD runaway process destroys the device. Copyright © 2005 by ASME.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers, Heat Transfer Division, (Publication) HTDen_US
dc.titleTime-resolved microscale temperature measurements of high-power semiconductor lasersen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, PKL:pklc@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, PKL=rp01532en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33645677161en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33645677161&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume376 HTDen_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage657en_US
dc.identifier.epage662en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, PKL=35742829700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSathe, AD=15036714200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPipe, KP=6603768450en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPlant, JJ=7103190594en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJuodawlkis, PW=6603752090en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats