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Conference Paper: Dispersive Fourier transform using few-mode fibers for real-time and high-speed spectroscopy

TitleDispersive Fourier transform using few-mode fibers for real-time and high-speed spectroscopy
Authors
KeywordsUltrafast real-time spectroscopy
Spectroscopy
Group velocity dispersion
Few-mode fibers
Dispersive Fourier transform
Dispersive fibers
Biomedical diagnostics
Issue Date2012
PublisherSociety of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spie.org/app/Publications/index.cfm?fuseaction=proceedings
Citation
SPIE Photonics West 2012, San Francisco, CA., 21-26 January 2012. In Proceedings of SPIE, 2012, v. 8218, article no. 82180P, p. 82180P-1-82180P-6 How to Cite?
AbstractDispersive Fourier Transform (DFT) is a powerful technique for real-time and high-speed spectroscopy. In DFT, the spectral information of an optical pulse is mapped into time using group velocity dispersion (GVD) in the dispersive fibers with an ultrafast real-time spectral acquisition rate (>10 MHz). Typically, multi-mode fiber (MMF) is not recommended for performing DFT because the modal dispersion, which occurs simultaneously with GVD, introduces the ambiguity in the wavelength-to-time mapping during DFT. Nevertheless, we here demonstrate that a clear wavelength-to-time mapping in DFT can be achieved by using the few-mode fibers (FMFs) which, instead of having hundreds of propagation modes, support only a few modes. FMF-based DFT becomes appealing when it operates at the shorter wavelengths e.g. 1-μm range-a favorable spectral window for biomedical diagnostics, where low-cost single mode fibers (SMFs) and high-performance dispersion-engineered fibers are not readily available for DFT. By employing the telecommunication SMFs (e.g. SMF28), which are in effect FMFs in the 1-μm range as their cut-off wavelength is ∼1260 nm, we observe that a 3nm wide spectrum can be clearly mapped into time with a GVD as high as -72ps/nm and a loss of 5 dB/km at a spectral acquisition rate of 20 MHz. Moreover, its larger core size than the high-cost 1-μm SMFs renders FMFs to exhibit less nonlinearity, especially high-power amplification is implemented during DFT to enhance the detection sensitivity without compromising the speed. Hence, FMF-based DFT represents a cost-effective approach to realize high-speed DFT-based spectroscopy particularly in the biomedical diagnostics spectral window. © 2012 SPIE.
DescriptionOptical Fibers and Sensors for Medical Diagnostics and Treatment Applications XII
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/158794
ISSN
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorQiu, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, KKYen_US
dc.contributor.authorTsia, KKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T09:01:22Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T09:01:22Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationSPIE Photonics West 2012, San Francisco, CA., 21-26 January 2012. In Proceedings of SPIE, 2012, v. 8218, article no. 82180P, p. 82180P-1-82180P-6en_US
dc.identifier.issn0277-786Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/158794-
dc.descriptionOptical Fibers and Sensors for Medical Diagnostics and Treatment Applications XII-
dc.description.abstractDispersive Fourier Transform (DFT) is a powerful technique for real-time and high-speed spectroscopy. In DFT, the spectral information of an optical pulse is mapped into time using group velocity dispersion (GVD) in the dispersive fibers with an ultrafast real-time spectral acquisition rate (>10 MHz). Typically, multi-mode fiber (MMF) is not recommended for performing DFT because the modal dispersion, which occurs simultaneously with GVD, introduces the ambiguity in the wavelength-to-time mapping during DFT. Nevertheless, we here demonstrate that a clear wavelength-to-time mapping in DFT can be achieved by using the few-mode fibers (FMFs) which, instead of having hundreds of propagation modes, support only a few modes. FMF-based DFT becomes appealing when it operates at the shorter wavelengths e.g. 1-μm range-a favorable spectral window for biomedical diagnostics, where low-cost single mode fibers (SMFs) and high-performance dispersion-engineered fibers are not readily available for DFT. By employing the telecommunication SMFs (e.g. SMF28), which are in effect FMFs in the 1-μm range as their cut-off wavelength is ∼1260 nm, we observe that a 3nm wide spectrum can be clearly mapped into time with a GVD as high as -72ps/nm and a loss of 5 dB/km at a spectral acquisition rate of 20 MHz. Moreover, its larger core size than the high-cost 1-μm SMFs renders FMFs to exhibit less nonlinearity, especially high-power amplification is implemented during DFT to enhance the detection sensitivity without compromising the speed. Hence, FMF-based DFT represents a cost-effective approach to realize high-speed DFT-based spectroscopy particularly in the biomedical diagnostics spectral window. © 2012 SPIE.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSociety of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spie.org/app/Publications/index.cfm?fuseaction=proceedingsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineeringen_US
dc.rightsProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Copyright © Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectUltrafast real-time spectroscopyen_US
dc.subjectSpectroscopyen_US
dc.subjectGroup velocity dispersionen_US
dc.subjectFew-mode fibersen_US
dc.subjectDispersive Fourier transformen_US
dc.subjectDispersive fibersen_US
dc.subjectBiomedical diagnosticsen_US
dc.titleDispersive Fourier transform using few-mode fibers for real-time and high-speed spectroscopyen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailQiu, Y: yiqiu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, KKY: kywong04@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTsia, KK: tsia@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, KKY=rp00189en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1117/12.907785en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84861974807en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros209705-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84861974807&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume8218, article no. 82180Pen_US
dc.identifier.spage82180P-1-
dc.identifier.epage82180P-6-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000302573600022-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsia, KK=6506659574en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, KKY=54901596100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, C=36538359400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQiu, Y=47561830000en_US

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