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Conference Paper: Dispersive Fourier transform using few-mode fibers for real-time and high-speed spectroscopy

TitleDispersive Fourier transform using few-mode fibers for real-time and high-speed spectroscopy
Authors
KeywordsUltrafast real-time spectroscopy
Spectroscopy
Group velocity dispersion
Few-mode fibers
Dispersive Fourier transform
Dispersive fibers
Biomedical diagnostics
Issue Date2012
PublisherSociety of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spie.org/app/Publications/index.cfm?fuseaction=proceedings
Citation
SPIE Photonics West 2012, San Francisco, CA., 21-26 January 2012. In Proceedings of SPIE, 2012, v. 8218, article no. 82180P, p. 1-6 How to Cite?
AbstractDispersive Fourier Transform (DFT) is a powerful technique for real-time and high-speed spectroscopy. In DFT, the spectral information of an optical pulse is mapped into time using group velocity dispersion (GVD) in the dispersive fibers with an ultrafast real-time spectral acquisition rate (>10 MHz). Typically, multi-mode fiber (MMF) is not recommended for performing DFT because the modal dispersion, which occurs simultaneously with GVD, introduces the ambiguity in the wavelength-to-time mapping during DFT. Nevertheless, we here demonstrate that a clear wavelength-to-time mapping in DFT can be achieved by using the few-mode fibers (FMFs) which, instead of having hundreds of propagation modes, support only a few modes. FMF-based DFT becomes appealing when it operates at the shorter wavelengths e.g. 1-μm range-a favorable spectral window for biomedical diagnostics, where low-cost single mode fibers (SMFs) and high-performance dispersion-engineered fibers are not readily available for DFT. By employing the telecommunication SMFs (e.g. SMF28), which are in effect FMFs in the 1-μm range as their cut-off wavelength is ∼1260 nm, we observe that a 3nm wide spectrum can be clearly mapped into time with a GVD as high as -72ps/nm and a loss of 5 dB/km at a spectral acquisition rate of 20 MHz. Moreover, its larger core size than the high-cost 1-μm SMFs renders FMFs to exhibit less nonlinearity, especially high-power amplification is implemented during DFT to enhance the detection sensitivity without compromising the speed. Hence, FMF-based DFT represents a cost-effective approach to realize high-speed DFT-based spectroscopy particularly in the biomedical diagnostics spectral window. © 2012 SPIE.
DescriptionOptical Fibers and Sensors for Medical Diagnostics and Treatment Applications XII
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/158794
ISSN
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorQiu, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, KKYen_US
dc.contributor.authorTsia, KKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T09:01:22Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T09:01:22Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationSPIE Photonics West 2012, San Francisco, CA., 21-26 January 2012. In Proceedings of SPIE, 2012, v. 8218, article no. 82180P, p. 1-6en_US
dc.identifier.issn0277-786Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/158794-
dc.descriptionOptical Fibers and Sensors for Medical Diagnostics and Treatment Applications XII-
dc.description.abstractDispersive Fourier Transform (DFT) is a powerful technique for real-time and high-speed spectroscopy. In DFT, the spectral information of an optical pulse is mapped into time using group velocity dispersion (GVD) in the dispersive fibers with an ultrafast real-time spectral acquisition rate (>10 MHz). Typically, multi-mode fiber (MMF) is not recommended for performing DFT because the modal dispersion, which occurs simultaneously with GVD, introduces the ambiguity in the wavelength-to-time mapping during DFT. Nevertheless, we here demonstrate that a clear wavelength-to-time mapping in DFT can be achieved by using the few-mode fibers (FMFs) which, instead of having hundreds of propagation modes, support only a few modes. FMF-based DFT becomes appealing when it operates at the shorter wavelengths e.g. 1-μm range-a favorable spectral window for biomedical diagnostics, where low-cost single mode fibers (SMFs) and high-performance dispersion-engineered fibers are not readily available for DFT. By employing the telecommunication SMFs (e.g. SMF28), which are in effect FMFs in the 1-μm range as their cut-off wavelength is ∼1260 nm, we observe that a 3nm wide spectrum can be clearly mapped into time with a GVD as high as -72ps/nm and a loss of 5 dB/km at a spectral acquisition rate of 20 MHz. Moreover, its larger core size than the high-cost 1-μm SMFs renders FMFs to exhibit less nonlinearity, especially high-power amplification is implemented during DFT to enhance the detection sensitivity without compromising the speed. Hence, FMF-based DFT represents a cost-effective approach to realize high-speed DFT-based spectroscopy particularly in the biomedical diagnostics spectral window. © 2012 SPIE.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSociety of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spie.org/app/Publications/index.cfm?fuseaction=proceedingsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineeringen_US
dc.rightsCopyright 2012 Society of Photo‑Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). One print or electronic copy may be made for personal use only. Systematic reproduction and distribution, duplication of any material in this publication for a fee or for commercial purposes, and modification of the contents of the publication are prohibited. This article is available online at https://doi.org/10.1117/12.907785-
dc.subjectUltrafast real-time spectroscopyen_US
dc.subjectSpectroscopyen_US
dc.subjectGroup velocity dispersionen_US
dc.subjectFew-mode fibersen_US
dc.subjectDispersive Fourier transformen_US
dc.subjectDispersive fibersen_US
dc.subjectBiomedical diagnosticsen_US
dc.titleDispersive Fourier transform using few-mode fibers for real-time and high-speed spectroscopyen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailQiu, Y: yiqiu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, KKY: kywong04@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTsia, KK: tsia@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, KKY=rp00189en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1117/12.907785en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84861974807en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros209705-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84861974807&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume8218en_US
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 82180P, p. 1-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 82180P, p. 6-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000302573600022-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsia, KK=6506659574en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, KKY=54901596100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, C=36538359400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQiu, Y=47561830000en_US

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