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Conference Paper: A rodent model of chronic compressive cervical myelopathy

TitleA rodent model of chronic compressive cervical myelopathy
Authors
KeywordsCervical myelopathy
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Rat
Somatosensory-evoked potential
Spinal cord compression
Issue Date2009
Citation
2009 4Th International Ieee/Embs Conference On Neural Engineering, Ner '09, 2009, p. 191-194 How to Cite?
AbstractDegenerative chronic spinal cord compression induced cervical myelopathy is a common cause of spinal cord dysfunction. The disease generally leads to impairment of the sensory and motor function of the cord progressively and insidiously. However, the underlying pathophysiology and the precise mechanism of the disease are still uncertain and remain to be investigated. The establishment of an animal model which reproduces the clinical condition of cervical myelopathy would be helpful for better understanding to the disease. In this study, a rat model of chronic spinal cord compression was developed by implantation of water-absorbing polymer at the lateral side of the spinal canal. The structural and functional change of the spinal cord due to compression were then assessed with different techniques - Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for the structural assessment, and motor behavioral scoring and somatosensory-evoked potential (SSEP) for the functional evaluation. From the MR images the 1/4-lateral compression ratios are computed. The result shows that the compression is significant by compared with the compression ratios of the adjacent levels (p < 0.01). However, the severe changes of SSEP did not show a close correlation with the compression ratios, suggesting that MRI findings are not automatically associated with functional deficits in spinal cord. Further classification of animal based on SSEP response shows that latency delay was more severe with higher categories. It is suggested that changes in latency might be a prognosis for the surgical outcome, which animals in higher categories may have higher chance to have permanent loss of spinal cord function. ©2009 IEEE.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/158599
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, DTHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHu, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWu, EXen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLuk, KDKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T09:00:24Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T09:00:24Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citation2009 4Th International Ieee/Embs Conference On Neural Engineering, Ner '09, 2009, p. 191-194en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/158599-
dc.description.abstractDegenerative chronic spinal cord compression induced cervical myelopathy is a common cause of spinal cord dysfunction. The disease generally leads to impairment of the sensory and motor function of the cord progressively and insidiously. However, the underlying pathophysiology and the precise mechanism of the disease are still uncertain and remain to be investigated. The establishment of an animal model which reproduces the clinical condition of cervical myelopathy would be helpful for better understanding to the disease. In this study, a rat model of chronic spinal cord compression was developed by implantation of water-absorbing polymer at the lateral side of the spinal canal. The structural and functional change of the spinal cord due to compression were then assessed with different techniques - Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for the structural assessment, and motor behavioral scoring and somatosensory-evoked potential (SSEP) for the functional evaluation. From the MR images the 1/4-lateral compression ratios are computed. The result shows that the compression is significant by compared with the compression ratios of the adjacent levels (p < 0.01). However, the severe changes of SSEP did not show a close correlation with the compression ratios, suggesting that MRI findings are not automatically associated with functional deficits in spinal cord. Further classification of animal based on SSEP response shows that latency delay was more severe with higher categories. It is suggested that changes in latency might be a prognosis for the surgical outcome, which animals in higher categories may have higher chance to have permanent loss of spinal cord function. ©2009 IEEE.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartof2009 4th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER '09en_HK
dc.subjectCervical myelopathyen_HK
dc.subjectMagnetic Resonance Imagingen_HK
dc.subjectRaten_HK
dc.subjectSomatosensory-evoked potentialen_HK
dc.subjectSpinal cord compressionen_HK
dc.titleA rodent model of chronic compressive cervical myelopathyen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHu, Y:yhud@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWu, EX:ewu1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLuk, KDK:hcm21000@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHu, Y=rp00432en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWu, EX=rp00193en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLuk, KDK=rp00333en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/NER.2009.5109266en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-70350215741en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-70350215741&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.spage191en_HK
dc.identifier.epage194en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, DTH=35746374500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHu, Y=7407116091en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, EX=7202128034en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLuk, KDK=7201921573en_HK

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