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Article: Exploring the impacts of safety culture on immigrants' vulnerability in non-motorized crashes: A cross-sectional study

TitleExploring the impacts of safety culture on immigrants' vulnerability in non-motorized crashes: A cross-sectional study
Authors
KeywordsImmigrants
Pedestrian And Cyclist Crash
Safety Assimilation
Safety Culture
Issue Date2012
Citation
Journal Of Urban Health, 2012, v. 89 n. 1, p. 138-152 How to Cite?
AbstractPedestrians and cyclists are a vulnerable group of road users. Immigrants are disproportionally represented in pedestrian and cyclist crashes. We postulate that the mismatch in safety culture between countries of their origin and the USA contribute to their vulnerability in pedestrian and cyclist crashes. Over time, the differences may disappear and immigrants' traffic behavior gravitates toward those of native-borns. We describe this process as safety assimilation. Using the pedestrian and cyclist crash database in New York City between 2001 and 2003, we examined the effects of foreign-born population, their countries of origin, and time of entry into the USA on census tract-level pedestrian and cyclist crashes. We find that neighborhoods with a higher concentration of immigrants, especially those from Latin America, Eastern Europe, and Asia, have more crashes. Our results also exhibit a pattern of the hypothesized safety assimilation process. The study suggests a higher level of vulnerability of immigrants to pedestrian and cyclist crashes. We propose that targeted policies and programs need to be developed for immigrants of different countries of origin. © 2011 The New York Academy of Medicine.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157935
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.046
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.244
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorLin, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorLoo, BPYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:56:23Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:56:23Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Urban Health, 2012, v. 89 n. 1, p. 138-152en_US
dc.identifier.issn1099-3460en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157935-
dc.description.abstractPedestrians and cyclists are a vulnerable group of road users. Immigrants are disproportionally represented in pedestrian and cyclist crashes. We postulate that the mismatch in safety culture between countries of their origin and the USA contribute to their vulnerability in pedestrian and cyclist crashes. Over time, the differences may disappear and immigrants' traffic behavior gravitates toward those of native-borns. We describe this process as safety assimilation. Using the pedestrian and cyclist crash database in New York City between 2001 and 2003, we examined the effects of foreign-born population, their countries of origin, and time of entry into the USA on census tract-level pedestrian and cyclist crashes. We find that neighborhoods with a higher concentration of immigrants, especially those from Latin America, Eastern Europe, and Asia, have more crashes. Our results also exhibit a pattern of the hypothesized safety assimilation process. The study suggests a higher level of vulnerability of immigrants to pedestrian and cyclist crashes. We propose that targeted policies and programs need to be developed for immigrants of different countries of origin. © 2011 The New York Academy of Medicine.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Urban Healthen_US
dc.subjectImmigrantsen_US
dc.subjectPedestrian And Cyclist Crashen_US
dc.subjectSafety Assimilationen_US
dc.subjectSafety Cultureen_US
dc.titleExploring the impacts of safety culture on immigrants' vulnerability in non-motorized crashes: A cross-sectional studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLoo, BPY:bpyloo@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLoo, BPY=rp00608en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11524-011-9629-7en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22173474-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84857918851en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84857918851&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume89en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage138en_US
dc.identifier.epage152en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000300673200012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, C=36143812800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLin, H=54417524500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLoo, BPY=7005145560en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike10160248-

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