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Article: Getting the China story right: Insights from national economic censuses

TitleGetting the China story right: Insights from national economic censuses
Authors
KeywordsCapitalism
China
Economic Census
Economic Transformation
Ownership Structure
Privatization
State-Owned Enterprises
Transitional Economy
Issue Date2011
Citation
Eurasian Geography And Economics, 2011, v. 52 n. 5, p. 712-746 How to Cite?
AbstractTwo Hong Kong-based geographers critically interrogate competing interpretations of the nature and dynamics of China's ongoing economic transformation. Based on the data gathered from China's first and second national economic censuses, they examine the pattern and process of ownership transformation in the Chinese economy, focusing on employment, capital assets, and output as well as productivity and industrial innovation. Emphasis is placed on the following critical issues: (1) after three decades of opening, China's national economy continues to be dominated by domestic enterprises (with foreign and overseas Chinese-invested enterprises limited to only a few industrial sectors and highly specific locales); (2) the bulk of capital assets and key large-scale industrial sectors remain in state ownership; and (3) spontaneous, bottom-up privatization of the labor market has occurred without a corresponding privatization of the capital market. In examining these and other issues, the authors argue that the evolving, complex "China story" can be better understood only after abandoning reliance on preconceived theoretical models derived primarily from Western experience. They support their case by first challenging the conventional neoliberal view of privatization as an independent force or predetermined condition, arguing instead that it is conditioned by prevailing social and political influences. Likewise, they posit that rapid expansion of private and individual businesses at the grassroots level has owed more to relaxed state control than to active state involvement envisioned by the thesis of state corporatism. Journal of Economic Literature, Classification Numbers: E22, E23, E24, O11, P20. 8 figures, 6 tables, 87 references.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157929
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.603
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.383
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLin, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorHu, Fen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:56:22Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:56:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationEurasian Geography And Economics, 2011, v. 52 n. 5, p. 712-746en_US
dc.identifier.issn1538-7216en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157929-
dc.description.abstractTwo Hong Kong-based geographers critically interrogate competing interpretations of the nature and dynamics of China's ongoing economic transformation. Based on the data gathered from China's first and second national economic censuses, they examine the pattern and process of ownership transformation in the Chinese economy, focusing on employment, capital assets, and output as well as productivity and industrial innovation. Emphasis is placed on the following critical issues: (1) after three decades of opening, China's national economy continues to be dominated by domestic enterprises (with foreign and overseas Chinese-invested enterprises limited to only a few industrial sectors and highly specific locales); (2) the bulk of capital assets and key large-scale industrial sectors remain in state ownership; and (3) spontaneous, bottom-up privatization of the labor market has occurred without a corresponding privatization of the capital market. In examining these and other issues, the authors argue that the evolving, complex "China story" can be better understood only after abandoning reliance on preconceived theoretical models derived primarily from Western experience. They support their case by first challenging the conventional neoliberal view of privatization as an independent force or predetermined condition, arguing instead that it is conditioned by prevailing social and political influences. Likewise, they posit that rapid expansion of private and individual businesses at the grassroots level has owed more to relaxed state control than to active state involvement envisioned by the thesis of state corporatism. Journal of Economic Literature, Classification Numbers: E22, E23, E24, O11, P20. 8 figures, 6 tables, 87 references.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEurasian Geography and Economicsen_US
dc.subjectCapitalismen_US
dc.subjectChinaen_US
dc.subjectEconomic Censusen_US
dc.subjectEconomic Transformationen_US
dc.subjectOwnership Structureen_US
dc.subjectPrivatizationen_US
dc.subjectState-Owned Enterprisesen_US
dc.subjectTransitional Economyen_US
dc.titleGetting the China story right: Insights from national economic censusesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLin, G:gcslin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLin, G=rp00609en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.2747/1539-7216.52.5.712en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-82955247142en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-82955247142&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume52en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage712en_US
dc.identifier.epage746en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000297861400007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLin, G=7401699741en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHu, F=54794196600en_US

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