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Article: Situating regional advantage in geographical political economy: Transformation of the state-owned enterprises in Guangzhou, China

TitleSituating regional advantage in geographical political economy: Transformation of the state-owned enterprises in Guangzhou, China
Authors
KeywordsChina
Evolutionary Economic Geography
Geographical Political Economy
Guangzhou
Lock-In
New Regionalism
Positionality
Regional Advantage
Soft Budget Constraint
State-Owned Enterprises
Issue Date2011
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/geoforum
Citation
Geoforum, 2011, v. 42 n. 6, p. 696-707 How to Cite?
AbstractDrawing upon insights from geographical political economy, this study examines the causal processes and mechanisms that underlined the growth and adaptation of state-owned enterprises in mechanical and electrical sectors (SOMEEs) in a leading Chinese city since market reforms. It reveals that the geographically specific and historically contingent political economy in which SOMEEs in Guangzhou were situated before economic reforms was the fundamental force underlying their successful adaptation in the post-reform period. SOMEEs in Guangzhou prior to market reforms were placed in a geographical political economy characterized by a special market orientation toward the production of low-end machinery for local needs and a loosely-coupled political linkage with the state apparatus. While such place-specific market and institutional relations were not favorable to the growth and survival of SOMEEs in Guangzhou in the Mao era, they have constituted an important source of regional advantage to enforce both market competitive pressure and hardened budget constraints on SOMEEs in Guangzhou and propel them to adopt efficient market-adaptation strategies and practices during the post-reform period. There is a need for 'scaling up' the theorization of regional advantage to go beyond the exclusive emphasis placed on the institutional dynamics endogenous to regional economies and take more seriously the unequal positions of regions within the extra-local structural relations of actually existing political-economic regimes. The paper advocates a place-contingent treatment of soft budget constraints in future studies on state-owned enterprises in China and other transitional economies. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157922
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.397
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.512
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHu, FZYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLin, GCSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:56:19Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:56:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationGeoforum, 2011, v. 42 n. 6, p. 696-707en_US
dc.identifier.issn0016-7185en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157922-
dc.description.abstractDrawing upon insights from geographical political economy, this study examines the causal processes and mechanisms that underlined the growth and adaptation of state-owned enterprises in mechanical and electrical sectors (SOMEEs) in a leading Chinese city since market reforms. It reveals that the geographically specific and historically contingent political economy in which SOMEEs in Guangzhou were situated before economic reforms was the fundamental force underlying their successful adaptation in the post-reform period. SOMEEs in Guangzhou prior to market reforms were placed in a geographical political economy characterized by a special market orientation toward the production of low-end machinery for local needs and a loosely-coupled political linkage with the state apparatus. While such place-specific market and institutional relations were not favorable to the growth and survival of SOMEEs in Guangzhou in the Mao era, they have constituted an important source of regional advantage to enforce both market competitive pressure and hardened budget constraints on SOMEEs in Guangzhou and propel them to adopt efficient market-adaptation strategies and practices during the post-reform period. There is a need for 'scaling up' the theorization of regional advantage to go beyond the exclusive emphasis placed on the institutional dynamics endogenous to regional economies and take more seriously the unequal positions of regions within the extra-local structural relations of actually existing political-economic regimes. The paper advocates a place-contingent treatment of soft budget constraints in future studies on state-owned enterprises in China and other transitional economies. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/geoforumen_US
dc.relation.ispartofGeoforumen_US
dc.subjectChinaen_US
dc.subjectEvolutionary Economic Geographyen_US
dc.subjectGeographical Political Economyen_US
dc.subjectGuangzhouen_US
dc.subjectLock-Inen_US
dc.subjectNew Regionalismen_US
dc.subjectPositionalityen_US
dc.subjectRegional Advantageen_US
dc.subjectSoft Budget Constrainten_US
dc.subjectState-Owned Enterprisesen_US
dc.titleSituating regional advantage in geographical political economy: Transformation of the state-owned enterprises in Guangzhou, Chinaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHu, FZY:fzyhu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLin, GCS:gcslin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHu, FZY=rp00861en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLin, GCS=rp00609en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.geoforum.2011.06.002en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80052282714en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80052282714&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume42en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage696en_US
dc.identifier.epage707en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000295666400008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHu, FZY=8350486300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLin, GCS=7401699741en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike9545895-

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