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Article: Environmental change, hillslope erosion and suspended sediment: Some observations from Hong Kong

TitleEnvironmental change, hillslope erosion and suspended sediment: Some observations from Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsEnvironmental Change
Hillfires
Landslides
Soil Erosion
Issue Date2009
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/catena
Citation
Catena, 2009, v. 79 n. 3, p. 198-204 How to Cite?
AbstractEvidence of environmental change in Hong Kong, including vegetation, climate and the frequency of hillfires is presented. Hillfires may be an important influence upon slope degradation in the territory. Field observations made in the Northwest New Territories provide evidence that hillfires increase soil erosion on slopes and result in higher storm-period concentrations of suspended sediment. Monitoring carried out in a small drainage basin reveals that landslides deliver sediment to an upland stream giving very high concentrations and affecting sediment properties, with the C and N content declining under the influence of landslides. Should environmental change alter the frequency of landsliding and hillfire on natural terrain in Hong Kong this will have implications for hillslope degradation and sediment transport in upland streams. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157913
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.612
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.191
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPeart, MRen_US
dc.contributor.authorHill, RDen_US
dc.contributor.authorFok, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:56:16Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:56:16Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationCatena, 2009, v. 79 n. 3, p. 198-204en_US
dc.identifier.issn0341-8162en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157913-
dc.description.abstractEvidence of environmental change in Hong Kong, including vegetation, climate and the frequency of hillfires is presented. Hillfires may be an important influence upon slope degradation in the territory. Field observations made in the Northwest New Territories provide evidence that hillfires increase soil erosion on slopes and result in higher storm-period concentrations of suspended sediment. Monitoring carried out in a small drainage basin reveals that landslides deliver sediment to an upland stream giving very high concentrations and affecting sediment properties, with the C and N content declining under the influence of landslides. Should environmental change alter the frequency of landsliding and hillfire on natural terrain in Hong Kong this will have implications for hillslope degradation and sediment transport in upland streams. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/catenaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofCatenaen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Changeen_US
dc.subjectHillfiresen_US
dc.subjectLandslidesen_US
dc.subjectSoil Erosionen_US
dc.titleEnvironmental change, hillslope erosion and suspended sediment: Some observations from Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailPeart, MR:mrpeart@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPeart, MR=rp00612en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.catena.2009.05.008en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77953128364en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77953128364&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume79en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage198en_US
dc.identifier.epage204en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1872-6887-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000272019300004-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeart, MR=7003362850en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHill, RD=7404752711en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFok, L=19933387900en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike5343732-

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