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Article: CaCO3 cycles in Salawusu river basin since 150 Ka B.P.

TitleCaCO3 cycles in Salawusu river basin since 150 Ka B.P.
Authors
Keywords150Ka B.P.
27 Sediment-Climatic Cycles
Caco3
Milanggouwan Section
Issue Date2001
Citation
Chinese Geographical Science, 2001, v. 11 n. 4, p. 336-342 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper, with Milanggouwan stratigraphic section as a typical section of the Salawusu River Basin, explores the relation between CaCO3 content distribution and climate change since 150 ka B. P. and concludes that: 1) The low-high changes of CaCO3 content in the section has a remarkable corresponding relation with the sedimentary cy-cles of ancient aeolian sand and overlying fluviolacustrine facies or palaeosols. 2) CaCO 3 distribution in aeolian sand is relatively meagre, ranging from 0. 8%-7. 18% , or on an average 2. 50% but relatively enriches in the fluviolacustrine faceis and palaeosols, ranging from 2. 20%-14. 9%, or on an average 5. 74%. This implies that they have different climatic backgrounds. The former was the product of erosion, transport and deposition by wind under arid and cold climatic conditions, whereas the latter was related to its special low-lying geomorphic position between the Ordos Plateau and Loess Plateau and warm-humid climatic environment. When the climatic became warm and humid, fluviola-custrine and swamp facies developed, soil-forming action strengthened, and low-lying catchment condition was favor-able to CaCO3 accumulation. 3) The basic cause responsible for the multicycle of CaCOs migration and accumula-tion in the Milanggouwan section may be the multiple alterations of winter and summer monsoons over the Mu Us Desert under the influences of climatic fluctuation of glacial and interglacial periods in the Northern Hemisphere since 150ka B. P.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157909
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.145
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.454
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLuo, KLen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, BSen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhu, YZen_US
dc.contributor.authorJin, HLen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, DDen_US
dc.contributor.authorYan, MCen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, HXen_US
dc.contributor.authorYao, CXen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, YHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:56:15Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:56:15Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citationChinese Geographical Science, 2001, v. 11 n. 4, p. 336-342en_US
dc.identifier.issn1002-0063en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157909-
dc.description.abstractThis paper, with Milanggouwan stratigraphic section as a typical section of the Salawusu River Basin, explores the relation between CaCO3 content distribution and climate change since 150 ka B. P. and concludes that: 1) The low-high changes of CaCO3 content in the section has a remarkable corresponding relation with the sedimentary cy-cles of ancient aeolian sand and overlying fluviolacustrine facies or palaeosols. 2) CaCO 3 distribution in aeolian sand is relatively meagre, ranging from 0. 8%-7. 18% , or on an average 2. 50% but relatively enriches in the fluviolacustrine faceis and palaeosols, ranging from 2. 20%-14. 9%, or on an average 5. 74%. This implies that they have different climatic backgrounds. The former was the product of erosion, transport and deposition by wind under arid and cold climatic conditions, whereas the latter was related to its special low-lying geomorphic position between the Ordos Plateau and Loess Plateau and warm-humid climatic environment. When the climatic became warm and humid, fluviola-custrine and swamp facies developed, soil-forming action strengthened, and low-lying catchment condition was favor-able to CaCO3 accumulation. 3) The basic cause responsible for the multicycle of CaCOs migration and accumula-tion in the Milanggouwan section may be the multiple alterations of winter and summer monsoons over the Mu Us Desert under the influences of climatic fluctuation of glacial and interglacial periods in the Northern Hemisphere since 150ka B. P.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofChinese Geographical Scienceen_US
dc.subject150Ka B.P.en_US
dc.subject27 Sediment-Climatic Cyclesen_US
dc.subjectCaco3en_US
dc.subjectMilanggouwan Sectionen_US
dc.titleCaCO3 cycles in Salawusu river basin since 150 Ka B.P.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailZhang, DD: zhangd@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, DD=rp00649en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-70449921257en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros71506-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-70449921257&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume11en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage336en_US
dc.identifier.epage342en_US
dc.publisher.placeChinaen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLuo, KL=7102436121en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, BS=23389484100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhu, YZ=24767951500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJin, HL=7403073387en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, DD=9732911600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYan, MC=7402521028en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, HX=23485757000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYao, CX=23993304800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, YH=7601315050en_US

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