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Article: Pedestrian injuries in an ageing society: insights from hospital trauma registry.

TitlePedestrian injuries in an ageing society: insights from hospital trauma registry.
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jtrauma.com
Citation
The Journal Of Trauma, 2009, v. 66 n. 4, p. 1196-1201 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Traffic safety of the elderly is a growing public health issue. METHODS: This study makes use of a linked hospital and police database. A total of 4,290 traffic casualty records were analyzed. The proportions of serious injury and mortality for different age groups are compared between pedestrian and nonpedestrian injuries. Logistic regression analysis is used to examine the relative significance of age, injury pattern, gender, crash time, and vehicle type on each dependent variable of hospital stay > or = 7 days, injury severity score (ISS) > 15, ISS > 30, and mortality. RESULTS: The shares of pedestrian casualties with serious injury increased with higher age groups. Among pedestrian casualties, aged > or = 65 years was the only statistically significant variable in accounting for ISS > 30 and mortality. Aged > or = 65 years, lower extremity injury and heavy vehicles were important in accounting for long hospital stay. For ISS > 15, aged > or = 65 years, head or face injury, and thorax or abdomen injury were significant risk factors. After adjusting for confounding factors, the risk of hospital stay > or = 7 days, ISS > 15, ISS > 30, and mortality for an elderly pedestrian injury was 4.24 times (95% CI, 2.46-7.29), 2.77 times (95% CI, 1.17-6.55), 5.16 times (95% CI, 1.38-19.34), and 3.61 times (95% CI, 1.16-11.25) higher than a younger adult (aged 15-64 years). In contrast, age was not a significant independent risk factor for serious injury and mortality among nonpedestrian injuries. CONCLUSIONS: Most developed economies are facing the problem of ageing. To develop an effective strategy to deal with elderly pedestrian trauma, a good quality linked database is a prerequisite.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157905
ISSN
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Outstanding Young Researcher Award
CRCG10207571
Funding Information:

Supported by the Outstanding Young Researcher Award and the CRCG research grant (10207571).

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLoo, BPen_US
dc.contributor.authorTsui, KLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:56:14Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:56:14Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Journal Of Trauma, 2009, v. 66 n. 4, p. 1196-1201en_US
dc.identifier.issn1529-8809en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157905-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Traffic safety of the elderly is a growing public health issue. METHODS: This study makes use of a linked hospital and police database. A total of 4,290 traffic casualty records were analyzed. The proportions of serious injury and mortality for different age groups are compared between pedestrian and nonpedestrian injuries. Logistic regression analysis is used to examine the relative significance of age, injury pattern, gender, crash time, and vehicle type on each dependent variable of hospital stay > or = 7 days, injury severity score (ISS) > 15, ISS > 30, and mortality. RESULTS: The shares of pedestrian casualties with serious injury increased with higher age groups. Among pedestrian casualties, aged > or = 65 years was the only statistically significant variable in accounting for ISS > 30 and mortality. Aged > or = 65 years, lower extremity injury and heavy vehicles were important in accounting for long hospital stay. For ISS > 15, aged > or = 65 years, head or face injury, and thorax or abdomen injury were significant risk factors. After adjusting for confounding factors, the risk of hospital stay > or = 7 days, ISS > 15, ISS > 30, and mortality for an elderly pedestrian injury was 4.24 times (95% CI, 2.46-7.29), 2.77 times (95% CI, 1.17-6.55), 5.16 times (95% CI, 1.38-19.34), and 3.61 times (95% CI, 1.16-11.25) higher than a younger adult (aged 15-64 years). In contrast, age was not a significant independent risk factor for serious injury and mortality among nonpedestrian injuries. CONCLUSIONS: Most developed economies are facing the problem of ageing. To develop an effective strategy to deal with elderly pedestrian trauma, a good quality linked database is a prerequisite.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jtrauma.com-
dc.relation.ispartofThe Journal of traumaen_US
dc.subject.meshAccidents, Traffic - Mortality - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshData Collectionen_US
dc.subject.meshDatabases, Factualen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInjury Severity Scoreen_US
dc.subject.meshLength Of Stayen_US
dc.subject.meshLogistic Modelsen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshOdds Ratioen_US
dc.subject.meshRegistriesen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.titlePedestrian injuries in an ageing society: insights from hospital trauma registry.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLoo, BP:bpyloo@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLoo, BP=rp00608en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/TA.0b013e31817fdef6-
dc.identifier.pmid19359937-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-65449142084en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros155267-
dc.identifier.volume66en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage1196en_US
dc.identifier.epage1201en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000265059800044-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLoo, BP=7005145560en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsui, KL=35745300400en_US

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