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Article: Local responses to inundation and de-farming in the reservoir region of the Three Gorges Project (China)

TitleLocal responses to inundation and de-farming in the reservoir region of the Three Gorges Project (China)
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00267/
Citation
Environmental Management, 2006, v. 38 n. 4, p. 618-637 How to Cite?
AbstractLarge-scale infrastructural developments in rural areas often impose significant direct and indirect impacts on environment and people. The Three Gorges Project to dam the Yangtze River in China will create a huge reservoir, inundate farmlands and villages, and incur large-scale resettlement. The concurrent de-farming program to reforest marginal farmlands on steep slopes imposes additional stresses on local people. This study evaluates the ecological and economic adjustments in rural areas affected by both projects, and explores villagers' knowledge, attitudes, perceptions, and expectations vis-à-vis the drastic changes. Eleven villages in Yunyang County in Sichuan Province, stratified into three zones based on topography and agriculture, were assessed by field studies, questionnaire surveys, maps, satellite imagery, and census and government reports. Multiple regressions identified predictors for 17 dependent variables. Spatial variations in the difficult terrain imposed zone-differentiated agricultural constraints, ecological impacts, and human responses. The dominant farming population-mainly young adults working as migrant laborers in cities-has adopted some nonagricultural work to supplement incomes. Expected per-capita standardized farmland (SF) exceeded threshold SF, which surpasses existing SF. Motivations to reclaim more farmlands, de-farm marginal lands, and become migrant laborers were explained by different multiple-regression predictors. Reduction in farmland stock by inundation and de-farming, aggravated by unwillingness towards nonlocal resettlement, would impose ecological pressures and stimulate demands for nonfarming incomes. Common anticipation of better future income and occupation has been subdued by unfavorable feedbacks from early relocatees. Future environmental and landscape changes are hinged upon changing human responses. Government policies could be informed by research findings to match economic, ecological, and social realities. © Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157880
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.857
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.830
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJim, CYen_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, FYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:56:07Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:56:07Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Management, 2006, v. 38 n. 4, p. 618-637en_US
dc.identifier.issn0364-152Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157880-
dc.description.abstractLarge-scale infrastructural developments in rural areas often impose significant direct and indirect impacts on environment and people. The Three Gorges Project to dam the Yangtze River in China will create a huge reservoir, inundate farmlands and villages, and incur large-scale resettlement. The concurrent de-farming program to reforest marginal farmlands on steep slopes imposes additional stresses on local people. This study evaluates the ecological and economic adjustments in rural areas affected by both projects, and explores villagers' knowledge, attitudes, perceptions, and expectations vis-à-vis the drastic changes. Eleven villages in Yunyang County in Sichuan Province, stratified into three zones based on topography and agriculture, were assessed by field studies, questionnaire surveys, maps, satellite imagery, and census and government reports. Multiple regressions identified predictors for 17 dependent variables. Spatial variations in the difficult terrain imposed zone-differentiated agricultural constraints, ecological impacts, and human responses. The dominant farming population-mainly young adults working as migrant laborers in cities-has adopted some nonagricultural work to supplement incomes. Expected per-capita standardized farmland (SF) exceeded threshold SF, which surpasses existing SF. Motivations to reclaim more farmlands, de-farm marginal lands, and become migrant laborers were explained by different multiple-regression predictors. Reduction in farmland stock by inundation and de-farming, aggravated by unwillingness towards nonlocal resettlement, would impose ecological pressures and stimulate demands for nonfarming incomes. Common anticipation of better future income and occupation has been subdued by unfavorable feedbacks from early relocatees. Future environmental and landscape changes are hinged upon changing human responses. Government policies could be informed by research findings to match economic, ecological, and social realities. © Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00267/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Managementen_US
dc.subject.meshAgricultureen_US
dc.subject.meshChinaen_US
dc.subject.meshConservation Of Natural Resourcesen_US
dc.subject.meshDemographyen_US
dc.subject.meshEconomicsen_US
dc.subject.meshEnvironmenten_US
dc.subject.meshRural Populationen_US
dc.titleLocal responses to inundation and de-farming in the reservoir region of the Three Gorges Project (China)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailJim, CY:hragjcy@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityJim, CY=rp00549en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00267-005-0253-8en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16841176-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33748985000en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33748985000&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume38en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage618en_US
dc.identifier.epage637en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000240714700008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJim, CY=7006143750en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, FY=37044114400en_US

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