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Article: Green-space preservation and allocation for sustainable greening of compact cities

TitleGreen-space preservation and allocation for sustainable greening of compact cities
Authors
KeywordsCompact City
Green City
Green Plan
Green Site
Green Space
Sustainable City
Urban Forest
Urban Tree
Issue Date2004
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/cities
Citation
Cities, 2004, v. 21 n. 4, p. 311-320 How to Cite?
AbstractIncluding greenery in human settlements is a tradition deeply rooted in antiquity, with diverse expressions. Realization of the green city ideal has changed with prevailing social-economic- political regimes and landscape styles. Variations in land use and development mode have generated green spaces of different geometry, distribution and composition. The compact city incurs inherent physical and institutional obstacles, restricting the quantity and quality of amenity vegetation. Recent research findings in arboriculture, urban forestry, urban ecology, urban planning and urban geography suggest alternative strategies for both existing and new green sites. A multidisciplinary interpretation distils relevant principles and practices to facilitate greening in packed neighborhoods and overcome major constraints. Measures are proposed to guard green spaces from intrusion, intensification and infilling to preserve both sites and conditions for plants, wildlife and ecological functions. New developments and redevelopments, with suitable encouragement and incentives, can earmark enough new green areas with appropriate location and design. Natural enclaves, especially woodlands, with high biodiversity and complex biomass should be incorporated into the future built environment. Partnership among government, developers and citizens should nurture the community's determination and capability to augment greening. A coordinating body to mobilize initiatives and efforts could gel disparate stakeholders and bring concerted actions. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157872
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.051
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.422
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJim, CYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:56:05Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:56:05Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationCities, 2004, v. 21 n. 4, p. 311-320en_US
dc.identifier.issn0264-2751en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157872-
dc.description.abstractIncluding greenery in human settlements is a tradition deeply rooted in antiquity, with diverse expressions. Realization of the green city ideal has changed with prevailing social-economic- political regimes and landscape styles. Variations in land use and development mode have generated green spaces of different geometry, distribution and composition. The compact city incurs inherent physical and institutional obstacles, restricting the quantity and quality of amenity vegetation. Recent research findings in arboriculture, urban forestry, urban ecology, urban planning and urban geography suggest alternative strategies for both existing and new green sites. A multidisciplinary interpretation distils relevant principles and practices to facilitate greening in packed neighborhoods and overcome major constraints. Measures are proposed to guard green spaces from intrusion, intensification and infilling to preserve both sites and conditions for plants, wildlife and ecological functions. New developments and redevelopments, with suitable encouragement and incentives, can earmark enough new green areas with appropriate location and design. Natural enclaves, especially woodlands, with high biodiversity and complex biomass should be incorporated into the future built environment. Partnership among government, developers and citizens should nurture the community's determination and capability to augment greening. A coordinating body to mobilize initiatives and efforts could gel disparate stakeholders and bring concerted actions. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/citiesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofCitiesen_US
dc.subjectCompact Cityen_US
dc.subjectGreen Cityen_US
dc.subjectGreen Planen_US
dc.subjectGreen Siteen_US
dc.subjectGreen Spaceen_US
dc.subjectSustainable Cityen_US
dc.subjectUrban Foresten_US
dc.subjectUrban Treeen_US
dc.titleGreen-space preservation and allocation for sustainable greening of compact citiesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0264-2751&volume=21&issue=4&spage=311&epage=320&date=2004&atitle=Green+Space+Preservation+and+Allocation+for+Sustainable+Greening+in+Compact+Cities-
dc.identifier.emailJim, CY: hragjcy@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityJim, CY=rp00549en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cities.2004.04.004en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-3142666990en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros90508-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-3142666990&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume21en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage311en_US
dc.identifier.epage320en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000223038400005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJim, CY=7006143750en_US

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