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Article: Urban environmental transitions and urban transportation systems: A comparison of the North American and Asian experiences

TitleUrban environmental transitions and urban transportation systems: A comparison of the North American and Asian experiences
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherLiverpool University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.liverpool-unipress.co.uk/third.htm
Citation
International Development Planning Review, 2003, v. 25 n. 4, p. 325-354 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article argues that the urban environmental transition as experienced by rapidly developing Asian cities is significantly different from that experienced by the West. Urban environmental transition theory suggests that cities undergo a series of environmental challenges as they develop. At first, the priority environmental challenges are those relating to the 'brown' agenda, including water supply, sewage and sanitation issues. As cities industrialise they are confronted by 'grey' agenda challenges or those associated with industrial and auto-related pollution. Cities in post-industrial societies are battling 'green' agenda challenges such as greenhouse gas emissions, ozone-depleting substances, non-point-source pollution and increasing volumes of municipal waste. This shift in type of impact is accompanied by a shift in scale (from local to global), timing (from immediate impacts to those that are delayed), and character (from health-threatening to ecosystem-threatening). While cities of the West have experienced these impacts in a sequential order, with one set sometimes emerging from the 'solutions' to the previous set, cities in rapidly developing Asia are experiencing a different, compressed form of the transition. The authors compare the development of urban transportation systems with other challenges to demonstrate this difference. This compressed urban environmental transition, in which challenges must be met within shorter timescales, also presents the problem of overlapping or telescoped sets of transition challenges.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157861
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.024
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.573
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMarcotullio, PJen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, YSFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:56:01Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:56:01Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Development Planning Review, 2003, v. 25 n. 4, p. 325-354en_US
dc.identifier.issn1474-6743en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157861-
dc.description.abstractThis article argues that the urban environmental transition as experienced by rapidly developing Asian cities is significantly different from that experienced by the West. Urban environmental transition theory suggests that cities undergo a series of environmental challenges as they develop. At first, the priority environmental challenges are those relating to the 'brown' agenda, including water supply, sewage and sanitation issues. As cities industrialise they are confronted by 'grey' agenda challenges or those associated with industrial and auto-related pollution. Cities in post-industrial societies are battling 'green' agenda challenges such as greenhouse gas emissions, ozone-depleting substances, non-point-source pollution and increasing volumes of municipal waste. This shift in type of impact is accompanied by a shift in scale (from local to global), timing (from immediate impacts to those that are delayed), and character (from health-threatening to ecosystem-threatening). While cities of the West have experienced these impacts in a sequential order, with one set sometimes emerging from the 'solutions' to the previous set, cities in rapidly developing Asia are experiencing a different, compressed form of the transition. The authors compare the development of urban transportation systems with other challenges to demonstrate this difference. This compressed urban environmental transition, in which challenges must be met within shorter timescales, also presents the problem of overlapping or telescoped sets of transition challenges.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLiverpool University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.liverpool-unipress.co.uk/third.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Development Planning Reviewen_US
dc.titleUrban environmental transitions and urban transportation systems: A comparison of the North American and Asian experiencesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, YSF:leey@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, YSF=rp00647en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-14844323265en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros91453-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-14844323265&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume25en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage325en_US
dc.identifier.epage354en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMarcotullio, PJ=6507504496en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, YSF=35558971900en_US

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