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Article: Weather sensitivity in household appliance energy end-use

TitleWeather sensitivity in household appliance energy end-use
Authors
KeywordsDegree-Day
Household Appliance
Residential Energy Study (Res)
Weather Sensitivity
Issue Date2004
PublisherElsevier SA. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enbuild
Citation
Energy And Buildings, 2004, v. 36 n. 2, p. 161-174 How to Cite?
AbstractData from a Residential Energy Study (RES) were used to examine the weather sensitivity of various household appliances located in households within the Sydney metropolitan area. Thermal environmental indices effective temperature (ET*), standard effective temperature (SET*) and simple air temperature degree-days were used to quantify the dependence of household appliance energy consumption on outdoor weather. Specific appliances included: room air-conditioners, room heaters, refrigerators, freezers and domestic hot-water systems, all of which exhibited some degree of weather sensitivity, particularly space heating and cooling devices. Probit regression techniques were used to predict the degree-day values at which households tend to switch on heating and cooling appliances. All appliances demonstrated weather sensitivity to varying degrees, and this was universally stronger during the cooling season (summer) than during the heating season (winter). The outdoor SET* version of the degree-day index demonstrated a stronger statistical association with space-cooling energy consumption than conventional air temperature degree-days. The mean daily temperature associated with minimum heating and cooling energy consumption for Sydney indicated that a temperature of 18 °C was the most appropriate base temperature for calculation of both heating and cooling degree-days. © 2003 Published by Elsevier B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157854
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.973
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.073
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHart, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorDe Dear, Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:55:59Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:55:59Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationEnergy And Buildings, 2004, v. 36 n. 2, p. 161-174en_US
dc.identifier.issn0378-7788en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157854-
dc.description.abstractData from a Residential Energy Study (RES) were used to examine the weather sensitivity of various household appliances located in households within the Sydney metropolitan area. Thermal environmental indices effective temperature (ET*), standard effective temperature (SET*) and simple air temperature degree-days were used to quantify the dependence of household appliance energy consumption on outdoor weather. Specific appliances included: room air-conditioners, room heaters, refrigerators, freezers and domestic hot-water systems, all of which exhibited some degree of weather sensitivity, particularly space heating and cooling devices. Probit regression techniques were used to predict the degree-day values at which households tend to switch on heating and cooling appliances. All appliances demonstrated weather sensitivity to varying degrees, and this was universally stronger during the cooling season (summer) than during the heating season (winter). The outdoor SET* version of the degree-day index demonstrated a stronger statistical association with space-cooling energy consumption than conventional air temperature degree-days. The mean daily temperature associated with minimum heating and cooling energy consumption for Sydney indicated that a temperature of 18 °C was the most appropriate base temperature for calculation of both heating and cooling degree-days. © 2003 Published by Elsevier B.V.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier SA. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enbuilden_US
dc.relation.ispartofEnergy and Buildingsen_US
dc.subjectDegree-Dayen_US
dc.subjectHousehold Applianceen_US
dc.subjectResidential Energy Study (Res)en_US
dc.subjectWeather Sensitivityen_US
dc.titleWeather sensitivity in household appliance energy end-useen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHart, M:mhart@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHart, M=rp00645en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.enbuild.2003.10.009en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0346969769en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0346969769&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume36en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage161en_US
dc.identifier.epage174en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000189122300008-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerlanden_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHart, M=15044213100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDe Dear, R=7004481673en_US

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