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Article: The growth and structural change of Chinese cities: A contextual and geographic analysis

TitleThe growth and structural change of Chinese cities: A contextual and geographic analysis
Authors
KeywordsChina
City Planning
Political Economy
System Of Cities
Urbanization
Issue Date2002
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/cities
Citation
Cities, 2002, v. 19 n. 5, p. 299-316 How to Cite?
AbstractRecent theoretical attempts to understand the dynamics of urban change in North America have been made predominantly on the basis of either the "growth machine" model or urban regime analysis, both of which see the growth of cities as the result of the interplay among some internal urban-based actors for financial gains and fortune building. This study adopts an approach that moves beyond internalism and the growth deterministic interpretation of urban change, to analyzing the functional and spatial (re)positioning of cities as a system or systems in the broader context of regional growth and national development strategies. The city in China has functioned not simply as a body of assets and property but more as the center of economic and social transformation engineered by the state for both growth and nongrowth considerations. Prior to the 1978 economic reforms, the system of cities created by the Maoist regime was dominated by large and extra-large cities because of the imperatives of optimum industrialization. For the strategic consideration of national defense, most of the new cities were developed in the central and western interior rather than the eastern coast. Market reforms and relaxation of state control over local development since the late 1970s have allowed a large number of small cities and towns to flourish on the basis of bottom-up rural transformative development. The intrusion of global market forces has helped re-consolidate the dominance of the eastern coast in China's urban development. China's urban development over the past five decades has been the direct outcome of national political strategizing, state articulation and reconfiguration, and shifts in global capital accumulation. A superimposed dual-track system of urban settlements integrating the Maoist legacy of large city dominance at the top with the rapidly expanding component of small cities and towns in the bottom is quickly taking shape to characterize China's urban development and urbanization. © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157837
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.051
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.422
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLin, GCSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:55:53Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:55:53Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationCities, 2002, v. 19 n. 5, p. 299-316en_US
dc.identifier.issn0264-2751en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157837-
dc.description.abstractRecent theoretical attempts to understand the dynamics of urban change in North America have been made predominantly on the basis of either the "growth machine" model or urban regime analysis, both of which see the growth of cities as the result of the interplay among some internal urban-based actors for financial gains and fortune building. This study adopts an approach that moves beyond internalism and the growth deterministic interpretation of urban change, to analyzing the functional and spatial (re)positioning of cities as a system or systems in the broader context of regional growth and national development strategies. The city in China has functioned not simply as a body of assets and property but more as the center of economic and social transformation engineered by the state for both growth and nongrowth considerations. Prior to the 1978 economic reforms, the system of cities created by the Maoist regime was dominated by large and extra-large cities because of the imperatives of optimum industrialization. For the strategic consideration of national defense, most of the new cities were developed in the central and western interior rather than the eastern coast. Market reforms and relaxation of state control over local development since the late 1970s have allowed a large number of small cities and towns to flourish on the basis of bottom-up rural transformative development. The intrusion of global market forces has helped re-consolidate the dominance of the eastern coast in China's urban development. China's urban development over the past five decades has been the direct outcome of national political strategizing, state articulation and reconfiguration, and shifts in global capital accumulation. A superimposed dual-track system of urban settlements integrating the Maoist legacy of large city dominance at the top with the rapidly expanding component of small cities and towns in the bottom is quickly taking shape to characterize China's urban development and urbanization. © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/citiesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofCitiesen_US
dc.subjectChinaen_US
dc.subjectCity Planningen_US
dc.subjectPolitical Economyen_US
dc.subjectSystem Of Citiesen_US
dc.subjectUrbanizationen_US
dc.titleThe growth and structural change of Chinese cities: A contextual and geographic analysisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLin, GCS:gcslin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLin, GCS=rp00609en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0264-2751(02)00039-2en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036772622en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros80805-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036772622&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume19en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage299en_US
dc.identifier.epage316en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000178804300002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLin, GCS=7401699741en_US

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