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Article: Hong Kong and the globalisation of the Chinese diaspora: A geographical perspective

TitleHong Kong and the globalisation of the Chinese diaspora: A geographical perspective
Authors
KeywordsGlobalisation
Hong Kong
Migration
Urban-Rural Interaction
Urbanisation
Issue Date2002
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/APV
Citation
Asia Pacific Viewpoint, 2002, v. 43 n. 1, p. 63-91 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study examines the processes of spatial restructuring in the Hong Kong-South China region. The paper analyses urban-rural interaction in a historical and transnational context. Based on detailed census data collected in 1961 and 1996, this study traces the origins of the Hongkongers and maps out their spatial distribution according to their native place identities. The heightened population movement between the rural hinterland in the South China region and the Hong Kong metropolis is inseparable from territorial organisation on the Chinese mainland. The great spatial mobility demonstrated by the Hongkongers, or, their 'refugee mentality' as it is known, is found to be deeply rooted in their marginal sub-ethnic identity in the nation. A systematic analysis of spatial data reveals that the diasporic landscape developed in Hong Kong has been polarised by the élite English and Shanghainese speakers on the one end and the Kejia people on the other end. Despite the processes of globalisation, the great spatial mobility of the Hong Kong sojourners and the diasporic landscape they have created have been effectively shaped by their place-based ethno-linguistic identities. If the transnational movement of people is considered an important component of globalisation, then this study reinforces the importance of locality and contests the fashionable notion of globalisation as a 'placeless' phenomenon. The seemingly displaced empire of Chinese diaspora capitalism, in which Hong Kong has played a crucial part, has remained grounded by pre-existing place-specific conditions.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157833
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.204
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.616
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLin, GCSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:55:53Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:55:53Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationAsia Pacific Viewpoint, 2002, v. 43 n. 1, p. 63-91en_US
dc.identifier.issn1360-7456en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157833-
dc.description.abstractThis study examines the processes of spatial restructuring in the Hong Kong-South China region. The paper analyses urban-rural interaction in a historical and transnational context. Based on detailed census data collected in 1961 and 1996, this study traces the origins of the Hongkongers and maps out their spatial distribution according to their native place identities. The heightened population movement between the rural hinterland in the South China region and the Hong Kong metropolis is inseparable from territorial organisation on the Chinese mainland. The great spatial mobility demonstrated by the Hongkongers, or, their 'refugee mentality' as it is known, is found to be deeply rooted in their marginal sub-ethnic identity in the nation. A systematic analysis of spatial data reveals that the diasporic landscape developed in Hong Kong has been polarised by the élite English and Shanghainese speakers on the one end and the Kejia people on the other end. Despite the processes of globalisation, the great spatial mobility of the Hong Kong sojourners and the diasporic landscape they have created have been effectively shaped by their place-based ethno-linguistic identities. If the transnational movement of people is considered an important component of globalisation, then this study reinforces the importance of locality and contests the fashionable notion of globalisation as a 'placeless' phenomenon. The seemingly displaced empire of Chinese diaspora capitalism, in which Hong Kong has played a crucial part, has remained grounded by pre-existing place-specific conditions.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/APVen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAsia Pacific Viewpointen_US
dc.subjectGlobalisationen_US
dc.subjectHong Kongen_US
dc.subjectMigrationen_US
dc.subjectUrban-Rural Interactionen_US
dc.subjectUrbanisationen_US
dc.titleHong Kong and the globalisation of the Chinese diaspora: A geographical perspectiveen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLin, GCS:gcslin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLin, GCS=rp00609en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1467-8373.00158-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036322659en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros69586-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036322659&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume43en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage63en_US
dc.identifier.epage91en_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLin, GCS=7401699741en_US

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