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Article: Patterns and dynamics of urban forests in relation to land use and development history in Guangzhou City, China

TitlePatterns and dynamics of urban forests in relation to land use and development history in Guangzhou City, China
Authors
KeywordsChina
Development History
Guangzhou
Land Use
Urban Greening
Urban Trees
Issue Date2001
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/GEOJ
Citation
The Geographical Journal, 2001, v. 167 n. 4, p. 358-375 How to Cite?
AbstractTrees in cities display a varied pattern that is often moulded by a city's physical fabric and its evolution through time. The town plan expressed in spatial dimension as land use, and in temporal sense as development history, furnishes a framework to evaluate the intricate association between city and trees. Guangzhou city, the premier metropolis of south China, has been established for 2800 years, and has a long history of urban greening and heterogeneous land use. Five urban districts, which represent old, middle-aged and young stages of development and cover the bulk of the city's built-up zones, form the study area. Interpretation of aerial photographs is used as a basis to classify the urban forest into three types, and to design a sampling scheme for studying trees in urban parks, institutional grounds and roadsides. District history has bequeathed a plethora of configurations in terms of buildings, roads and land uses, accompanied by plantable spaces of dissimilar dimensions, geometry and quality. The districts display diverse tree attributes such as frequency, density and species diversity. Young districts, with lower density, more institutional uses and wider roads, present more opportunities for greening. Recent shifts in landscape fashion have introduced a significantly different treescape. A few exceptionally large parks and institutional sites play a pivotal role in the city's tree assets. Parks, roadsides and institutional forests have different tree-stocking rates and species assemblages. Implications for future planting and management of urban trees in different situations, and for the greening of other cities in China, and other developing countries, are explored.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157830
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.206
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.880
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJim, CYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, HTen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:55:52Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:55:52Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Geographical Journal, 2001, v. 167 n. 4, p. 358-375en_US
dc.identifier.issn0016-7398en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157830-
dc.description.abstractTrees in cities display a varied pattern that is often moulded by a city's physical fabric and its evolution through time. The town plan expressed in spatial dimension as land use, and in temporal sense as development history, furnishes a framework to evaluate the intricate association between city and trees. Guangzhou city, the premier metropolis of south China, has been established for 2800 years, and has a long history of urban greening and heterogeneous land use. Five urban districts, which represent old, middle-aged and young stages of development and cover the bulk of the city's built-up zones, form the study area. Interpretation of aerial photographs is used as a basis to classify the urban forest into three types, and to design a sampling scheme for studying trees in urban parks, institutional grounds and roadsides. District history has bequeathed a plethora of configurations in terms of buildings, roads and land uses, accompanied by plantable spaces of dissimilar dimensions, geometry and quality. The districts display diverse tree attributes such as frequency, density and species diversity. Young districts, with lower density, more institutional uses and wider roads, present more opportunities for greening. Recent shifts in landscape fashion have introduced a significantly different treescape. A few exceptionally large parks and institutional sites play a pivotal role in the city's tree assets. Parks, roadsides and institutional forests have different tree-stocking rates and species assemblages. Implications for future planting and management of urban trees in different situations, and for the greening of other cities in China, and other developing countries, are explored.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/GEOJen_US
dc.relation.ispartofGeographical Journalen_US
dc.rightsThe Geographical Journal. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.-
dc.subjectChinaen_US
dc.subjectDevelopment Historyen_US
dc.subjectGuangzhouen_US
dc.subjectLand Useen_US
dc.subjectUrban Greeningen_US
dc.subjectUrban Treesen_US
dc.titlePatterns and dynamics of urban forests in relation to land use and development history in Guangzhou City, Chinaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0016-7398&volume=167&issue=4&spage=358&epage=375&date=2001&atitle=Patterns+and+Dynamics+of+Urban+Forests+in+Relation+to+Land+Use+and+Developmnt+History+in+Guangzhou+City,+China-
dc.identifier.emailJim, CY: hragjcy@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityJim, CY=rp00549en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1475-4959.00031-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035667861en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros69185-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035667861&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume167en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage358en_US
dc.identifier.epage375en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000172949200005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJim, CY=7006143750en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, HT=7409747863en_US
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 130425-

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