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Article: China: A third world country or global economic power? | China: Dritt-Welt-Land oder globale Wirtschaftsmacht?

TitleChina: A third world country or global economic power? | China: Dritt-Welt-Land oder globale Wirtschaftsmacht?
Authors
Issue Date2001
Citation
Geographische Rundschau, 2001, v. 53 n. 10, p. 4-9 How to Cite?
AbstractChina's economic, political, and military potentials have captured much attention from scholars, government leaders, diplomats, and multinationals. This paper examines a number of controversial issues brought out by Gerald Segal in his provocative and critical evaluation of China's position in the world. China has become the world's second largest economy in terms of GNP and second largest recipient of Foreign Direct Investment next only to the US. China's low GNP per capital reported by the World Bank has been distorted by the successive depreciation of the Chinese currency and political pressure exerted by the Chinese government. The Chinese economy has been growing at a pace faster than ever before and higher than most of other countries in the world. The Chinese people have enjoyed remarkably high life expectancy and low adult illiteracy. China's military capacities are far below the level of being a peer competitor of the US. Nonetheless, China matters more than simply "a normal medium power" because of its permanent vetobearing membership of the UN's Security Council, its possession of mass-destruction weapons, and its special political system that operates differently from those of the west. American strategic interests in China and the Asia-Pacific region can be better pursued through dialogue rather than confrontation, mutual respect rather than intimidation, incorporation rather than alienation, and social transition promotion rather than regime transformation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157824
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.104
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLin, GSen_US
dc.contributor.authorHu, Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:55:50Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:55:50Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citationGeographische Rundschau, 2001, v. 53 n. 10, p. 4-9en_US
dc.identifier.issn0016-7460en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157824-
dc.description.abstractChina's economic, political, and military potentials have captured much attention from scholars, government leaders, diplomats, and multinationals. This paper examines a number of controversial issues brought out by Gerald Segal in his provocative and critical evaluation of China's position in the world. China has become the world's second largest economy in terms of GNP and second largest recipient of Foreign Direct Investment next only to the US. China's low GNP per capital reported by the World Bank has been distorted by the successive depreciation of the Chinese currency and political pressure exerted by the Chinese government. The Chinese economy has been growing at a pace faster than ever before and higher than most of other countries in the world. The Chinese people have enjoyed remarkably high life expectancy and low adult illiteracy. China's military capacities are far below the level of being a peer competitor of the US. Nonetheless, China matters more than simply "a normal medium power" because of its permanent vetobearing membership of the UN's Security Council, its possession of mass-destruction weapons, and its special political system that operates differently from those of the west. American strategic interests in China and the Asia-Pacific region can be better pursued through dialogue rather than confrontation, mutual respect rather than intimidation, incorporation rather than alienation, and social transition promotion rather than regime transformation.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofGeographische Rundschauen_US
dc.titleChina: A third world country or global economic power? | China: Dritt-Welt-Land oder globale Wirtschaftsmacht?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLin, GS:gcslin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailHu, Z:fzyhu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLin, GS=rp00609en_US
dc.identifier.authorityHu, Z=rp00861en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034796929en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034796929&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume53en_US
dc.identifier.issue10en_US
dc.identifier.spage4en_US
dc.identifier.epage9en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLin, GS=7401699741en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHu, Z=8350486300en_US

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