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Article: Pressure on urban trees in Hong Kong: Pervasive problem and possible amelioration

TitlePressure on urban trees in Hong Kong: Pervasive problem and possible amelioration
Authors
KeywordsCommunity Involvement And Perception
Development
Hong Kong
Infrastructure And Utilities
Transport Planning
Urban Forestry
Wall Flora
Issue Date1998
PublisherA B Academic Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.trees.org.uk/journal.php
Citation
Arboricultural Journal, 1998, v. 22 n. 1, p. 37-60 How to Cite?
AbstractUrban development in Hong Kong has left a tightly-packed town plan with little intervening space for trees. Limitation of available land in relation to a large population underscores the fundamental constraint. The planting tradition adopted since the founding of the city some 150 years ago was implemented when the urban matrix was still relatively porous. Recent intensification of development has imposed increasing pressure on the meagre tree stock. Pervasive shortage of plantable space is aggravated by its poor quality which deteriorates with land-use changes. Setting back building lots for amenity planting, if applied on a large scale, should bring permeation of greenery. Existing roadside and offroad habitats, including areas containing high-calibre specimen trees and woodland plots, are often lost to vehicular-traffic infrastructure and other community needs. Proliferation of underground utilities restricts chances for roadside trees. Frequent trenching to repair buried services and recently to install a territory-wide cable-television and communication network brings havoc to roots, and premature decline. Soils at planting sites, especially at roadsides, are beset by problems such as: shallowness, too many boulders and stones, excessively coarse texture, compaction, nutrient deficiency, alkaline reaction and pollution. Outmoded nursery practice, ineffective quality control, and lack of research on suitable cultivars have allowed widespread use of substandard planting materials. Whereas trained arboriculturists are employed by the government to look after public trees, the shortage of expertise and professionalism in the private sector degrades the quality of tree work. The poor match between species selection and planting-site conditions, and a large backlog of surgery work need to be addressed. Preservation efforts are not commensurate with the scarcity of outstanding trees, with worthwhile ones continually lost due mainly to construction activities. Transplanting, the protection of champion trees and those dwelling on old stone walls should be more earnestly adopted measures. The community needs to modify its rather apathetic attitude towards urban trees and furnish effective statutory measures to plan, plant and preserve trees to effect long-term improvement.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157806
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.151
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJim, CYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:55:45Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:55:45Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.citationArboricultural Journal, 1998, v. 22 n. 1, p. 37-60en_US
dc.identifier.issn0307-1375en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157806-
dc.description.abstractUrban development in Hong Kong has left a tightly-packed town plan with little intervening space for trees. Limitation of available land in relation to a large population underscores the fundamental constraint. The planting tradition adopted since the founding of the city some 150 years ago was implemented when the urban matrix was still relatively porous. Recent intensification of development has imposed increasing pressure on the meagre tree stock. Pervasive shortage of plantable space is aggravated by its poor quality which deteriorates with land-use changes. Setting back building lots for amenity planting, if applied on a large scale, should bring permeation of greenery. Existing roadside and offroad habitats, including areas containing high-calibre specimen trees and woodland plots, are often lost to vehicular-traffic infrastructure and other community needs. Proliferation of underground utilities restricts chances for roadside trees. Frequent trenching to repair buried services and recently to install a territory-wide cable-television and communication network brings havoc to roots, and premature decline. Soils at planting sites, especially at roadsides, are beset by problems such as: shallowness, too many boulders and stones, excessively coarse texture, compaction, nutrient deficiency, alkaline reaction and pollution. Outmoded nursery practice, ineffective quality control, and lack of research on suitable cultivars have allowed widespread use of substandard planting materials. Whereas trained arboriculturists are employed by the government to look after public trees, the shortage of expertise and professionalism in the private sector degrades the quality of tree work. The poor match between species selection and planting-site conditions, and a large backlog of surgery work need to be addressed. Preservation efforts are not commensurate with the scarcity of outstanding trees, with worthwhile ones continually lost due mainly to construction activities. Transplanting, the protection of champion trees and those dwelling on old stone walls should be more earnestly adopted measures. The community needs to modify its rather apathetic attitude towards urban trees and furnish effective statutory measures to plan, plant and preserve trees to effect long-term improvement.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherA B Academic Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.trees.org.uk/journal.phpen_US
dc.relation.ispartofArboricultural Journalen_US
dc.subjectCommunity Involvement And Perceptionen_US
dc.subjectDevelopmenten_US
dc.subjectHong Kongen_US
dc.subjectInfrastructure And Utilitiesen_US
dc.subjectTransport Planningen_US
dc.subjectUrban Forestryen_US
dc.subjectWall Floraen_US
dc.titlePressure on urban trees in Hong Kong: Pervasive problem and possible ameliorationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailJim, CY:hragjcy@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityJim, CY=rp00549en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031947078en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros33821-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0031947078&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume22en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage37en_US
dc.identifier.epage60en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJim, CY=7006143750en_US

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