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Article: Spatial disparities and economic development in China, 1953-92: A comparative study

TitleSpatial disparities and economic development in China, 1953-92: A comparative study
Authors
Issue Date1996
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/DECH
Citation
Development And Change, 1996, v. 27 n. 1, p. 131-163 How to Cite?
AbstractIt seems to be widely accepted that China's interior development during the Maoist period was based on 'equality' considerations, which narrowed Chinese regional disparities. By contrast, the recent coastal development during Deng's reform era has been coined as 'uneven' and 'undesirable', because it has created tremendous inequalities across the country. However, the findings of this study suggest that the question may not be that simple. This article examines the spatial disparities of economic development in China between 1953 and 1992, focusing on a time-series comparison between the development policies of Mao and Deng, their outcomes and the resulting changes. By using provincial and regional economic and investment data, the article elaborates why Mao's interior development did not lead to a more equitable outcome than Deng's uneven strategy of 'east coastal development'. The findings provide an insight into some of the unexpected outcomes of more than forty years of socialist development, in the realm of economic growth and disparity. © Institute of Social Studies 1996.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157796
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.72
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.069
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXiaobin, SZen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:55:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:55:43Z-
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.identifier.citationDevelopment And Change, 1996, v. 27 n. 1, p. 131-163en_US
dc.identifier.issn0012-155Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157796-
dc.description.abstractIt seems to be widely accepted that China's interior development during the Maoist period was based on 'equality' considerations, which narrowed Chinese regional disparities. By contrast, the recent coastal development during Deng's reform era has been coined as 'uneven' and 'undesirable', because it has created tremendous inequalities across the country. However, the findings of this study suggest that the question may not be that simple. This article examines the spatial disparities of economic development in China between 1953 and 1992, focusing on a time-series comparison between the development policies of Mao and Deng, their outcomes and the resulting changes. By using provincial and regional economic and investment data, the article elaborates why Mao's interior development did not lead to a more equitable outcome than Deng's uneven strategy of 'east coastal development'. The findings provide an insight into some of the unexpected outcomes of more than forty years of socialist development, in the realm of economic growth and disparity. © Institute of Social Studies 1996.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/DECHen_US
dc.relation.ispartofDevelopment and Changeen_US
dc.titleSpatial disparities and economic development in China, 1953-92: A comparative studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailXiaobin, SZ:sxzhao@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityXiaobin, SZ=rp00597en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029729602en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0029729602&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume27en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage131en_US
dc.identifier.epage163en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXiaobin, SZ=7403577707en_US

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