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Article: Visitor management in recreation areas

TitleVisitor management in recreation areas
Authors
Issue Date1989
Citation
Environmental Conservation, 1989, v. 16 n. 1, p. 19-32,40 How to Cite?
AbstractThe ever-increasing demands for outdoor recreation have caused widespread ecological damage in many parts of the world, so that methods to contain deleterious impacts and maintain the quality of recreational experience must be earnestly sought. This paper evaluates a spectrum of relevant options including the subtle (influencing user-behaviour), through the intermediate (redistributing use), to the regulatory (rationing use). The reduction of per caput impact can, naturally, raise the capacity of an area to accommodate continuing use. Minimum impact techniques can substantially curtail the largely inadvertent damage due to ignorance rather than malice, while recreational planning and management can take into account the changing user preference. Redistributing use can lessen impacts in over-used or vulnerable areas and reduce user conflicts. Various subtle measures can effect voluntary spread over space and time. As even low-level usage can cause significant ecological changes, the risk of spreading damage should be carefully gauged against management objectives. Rationing use, which erodes the spontaneity of recreational pursuits, should be used only as a last resort. A range of methods are assessed, none being considered ideal. -from Author
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157766

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJim, CYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:55:37Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:55:37Z-
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Conservation, 1989, v. 16 n. 1, p. 19-32,40en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157766-
dc.description.abstractThe ever-increasing demands for outdoor recreation have caused widespread ecological damage in many parts of the world, so that methods to contain deleterious impacts and maintain the quality of recreational experience must be earnestly sought. This paper evaluates a spectrum of relevant options including the subtle (influencing user-behaviour), through the intermediate (redistributing use), to the regulatory (rationing use). The reduction of per caput impact can, naturally, raise the capacity of an area to accommodate continuing use. Minimum impact techniques can substantially curtail the largely inadvertent damage due to ignorance rather than malice, while recreational planning and management can take into account the changing user preference. Redistributing use can lessen impacts in over-used or vulnerable areas and reduce user conflicts. Various subtle measures can effect voluntary spread over space and time. As even low-level usage can cause significant ecological changes, the risk of spreading damage should be carefully gauged against management objectives. Rationing use, which erodes the spontaneity of recreational pursuits, should be used only as a last resort. A range of methods are assessed, none being considered ideal. -from Authoren_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Conservationen_US
dc.titleVisitor management in recreation areasen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailJim, CY:hragjcy@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityJim, CY=rp00549en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0024807362en_US
dc.identifier.volume16en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage19en_US
dc.identifier.epage32,40en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJim, CY=7006143750en_US

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