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Article: Camping impacts on vegetation and soil in a Hong Kong country park

TitleCamping impacts on vegetation and soil in a Hong Kong country park
Authors
Issue Date1987
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/apgeog
Citation
Applied Geography, 1987, v. 7 n. 4, p. 317-332 How to Cite?
AbstractThe successful country parks programme in Hong Kong has attracted a heavy patronage and caused widespread degradation in recreational sites. Visitor impacts were studied in six camp sites representing three levels of use. Most changes in vegetation and soil, evaluated in absolute and relative terms, were statistically significant. Trampling resulted in loss of vegetation cover, and reduction in plant height and root biomass. Species composition shifted in response to increasing usage towards domination by a few trampling-resistant grasses (monocots) at the expense of sensitive woody dicots. The loss of vegetation and litter cover contributed to soil compaction, increases in bulk density, penetration resistance and bare soil cover, and decreases in void ratio and organic matter content. Structural damage led to reduction in water storage and infiltration rate. These effects have management implications with respect to the design and rehabilitation of sites to enhance durability and to relieve the excessive recreational burden. © 1987.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157756
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.565
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.306

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJim, CYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:55:35Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:55:35Z-
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.identifier.citationApplied Geography, 1987, v. 7 n. 4, p. 317-332en_US
dc.identifier.issn0143-6228en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157756-
dc.description.abstractThe successful country parks programme in Hong Kong has attracted a heavy patronage and caused widespread degradation in recreational sites. Visitor impacts were studied in six camp sites representing three levels of use. Most changes in vegetation and soil, evaluated in absolute and relative terms, were statistically significant. Trampling resulted in loss of vegetation cover, and reduction in plant height and root biomass. Species composition shifted in response to increasing usage towards domination by a few trampling-resistant grasses (monocots) at the expense of sensitive woody dicots. The loss of vegetation and litter cover contributed to soil compaction, increases in bulk density, penetration resistance and bare soil cover, and decreases in void ratio and organic matter content. Structural damage led to reduction in water storage and infiltration rate. These effects have management implications with respect to the design and rehabilitation of sites to enhance durability and to relieve the excessive recreational burden. © 1987.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/apgeogen_US
dc.relation.ispartofApplied Geographyen_US
dc.titleCamping impacts on vegetation and soil in a Hong Kong country parken_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailJim, CY:hragjcy@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityJim, CY=rp00549en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0023485991en_US
dc.identifier.volume7en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage317en_US
dc.identifier.epage332en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJim, CY=7006143750en_US

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