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Article: Two years after pandemic influenza A/2009/H1N1: What have we learned?

TitleTwo years after pandemic influenza A/2009/H1N1: What have we learned?
Authors
Issue Date2012
Citation
Clinical Microbiology Reviews, 2012, v. 25 n. 2, p. 223-263 How to Cite?
AbstractThe world had been anticipating another influenza pandemic since the last one in 1968. The pandemic influenza A H1N1 2009 virus (A/2009/H1N1) finally arrived, causing the first pandemic influenza of the new millennium, which has affected over 214 countries and caused over 18,449 deaths. Because of the persistent threat from the A/H5N1 virus since 1997 and the outbreak of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus in 2003, medical and scientific communities have been more prepared in mindset and infrastructure. This preparedness has allowed for rapid and effective research on the epidemiological, clinical, pathological, immunological, virological, and other basic scientific aspects of the disease, with impacts on its control. A PubMed search using the keywords "pandemic influenza virus H1N1 2009" yielded over 2,500 publications, which markedly exceeded the number published on previous pandemics. Only representative works with relevance to clinical microbiology and infectious diseases are reviewed in this article. A significant increase in the understanding of this virus and the disease within such a short amount of time has allowed for the timely development of diagnostic tests, treatments, and preventive measures. These findings could prove useful for future randomized controlled clinical trials and the epidemiological control of future pandemics. © 2012, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157687
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 16.187
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 8.741
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Providence Foundation, Ltd.
Shaw Foundation for Infectious Diseases Research
HKSAR
Consultancy Service for Enhancing Laboratory Surveillance of Emerging Infectious Disease
Funding Information:

We acknowledge research funding from the Providence Foundation, Ltd., in memory of the late Lui Hac Minh, the Shaw Foundation for Infectious Diseases Research, the HKSAR Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases of the Health, Welfare and Food Bureau, and the Consultancy Service for Enhancing Laboratory Surveillance of Emerging Infectious Disease for the HKSAR Department of Health.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheng, VCCen_US
dc.contributor.authorTo, KKWen_US
dc.contributor.authorTse, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorHung, IFNen_US
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:52:16Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:52:16Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Microbiology Reviews, 2012, v. 25 n. 2, p. 223-263en_US
dc.identifier.issn0893-8512en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157687-
dc.description.abstractThe world had been anticipating another influenza pandemic since the last one in 1968. The pandemic influenza A H1N1 2009 virus (A/2009/H1N1) finally arrived, causing the first pandemic influenza of the new millennium, which has affected over 214 countries and caused over 18,449 deaths. Because of the persistent threat from the A/H5N1 virus since 1997 and the outbreak of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus in 2003, medical and scientific communities have been more prepared in mindset and infrastructure. This preparedness has allowed for rapid and effective research on the epidemiological, clinical, pathological, immunological, virological, and other basic scientific aspects of the disease, with impacts on its control. A PubMed search using the keywords "pandemic influenza virus H1N1 2009" yielded over 2,500 publications, which markedly exceeded the number published on previous pandemics. Only representative works with relevance to clinical microbiology and infectious diseases are reviewed in this article. A significant increase in the understanding of this virus and the disease within such a short amount of time has allowed for the timely development of diagnostic tests, treatments, and preventive measures. These findings could prove useful for future randomized controlled clinical trials and the epidemiological control of future pandemics. © 2012, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Microbiology Reviewsen_US
dc.titleTwo years after pandemic influenza A/2009/H1N1: What have we learned?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTse, H:herman@graduate.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailHung, IFN:ivanhung@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY:kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailTo, KKW: kelvinto@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTse, H=rp00519en_US
dc.identifier.authorityHung, IFN=rp00508en_US
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366en_US
dc.identifier.authorityTo, KKW=rp01384-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/CMR.05012-11en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22491771-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84859520338en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros203188-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84859520338&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume25en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage223en_US
dc.identifier.epage263en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000302810500002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, VCC=38662328400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTo, KKW=55024912100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTse, H=7006070596en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHung, IFN=7006103457en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, KY=36078079100en_US

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