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Article: Brittle tail syndrome is an emerging infection in horses caused by a keratinolytic fungus Equicapillimyces hongkongensis gen. nov., sp. nov

TitleBrittle tail syndrome is an emerging infection in horses caused by a keratinolytic fungus Equicapillimyces hongkongensis gen. nov., sp. nov
Authors
KeywordsDermatophyte
Horses
Keratinolytic
Issue Date2012
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/vetmic
Citation
Veterinary Microbiology, 2012, v. 155 n. 2-4, p. 399-408 How to Cite?
Abstract
The newly described brittle tail syndrome causes weakening and breakage of the tail hair of horses. Extensive mycological and molecular studies showed that a novel fungus Equicapillimyces hongkongensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is the most likely cause of this syndrome. It is a septate branching hyaline mould which grows optimally at 30 °C, requires nicotinic acid but is inhibited by cycloheximide, and specifically infects horse hair. Hyphae fill the core of infected hair shafts with short-necked structures resembling ascomata containing banana-shaped septate ascospore-like structures perforating the hair cortex from within. Compared to asymptomatic horses (n= 31), horses with clinical signs of the syndrome (n= 22) are significantly more likely to have positive E. hongkongensis gen. nov., sp. nov. smear (6.5% vs. 100%), culture (6.5% vs. 72.7%), and PCR (32.3% vs. 100%, P< 0.001 for all). No other potential pathogens were found on bacteriological and mycological culture or PCR (for Trichophyton, Microsporum and Epidermophyton). Genotyping of pure E. hongkongensis gen. nov., sp. nov. isolates and their corresponding direct specimens by PCR and sequencing of the 18S rRNA, ITS1-5.8S-ITS2, 28S rRNA, beta-actin, beta-tubulin, and elongation factor 1 alpha showed that they are all identical but unique, and related distantly to fungi mostly in the class Sordariomycetes and the family Ophiostomataceae. Its geographical distribution, environmental or animal reservoirs are still unknown. Besides the ugly appearance of infected horse tails, this fungus may emerge as another equine pathogen if it affects the skin and hoof of horses. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157678
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 2.726
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.425
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Jockey Club
Department of Microbiology, Queen Mary Hospital
Ted Sun Foundation
Food and Health Bureau of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China
Funding Information:

We are most indebted to Mr Kam-Chu Han for his efforts in the preparation of the histology slides. The authors are grateful to the support from the staff of the Hong Kong Jockey Club and the Department of Microbiology, Queen Mary Hospital. The study is partially funded by the Ted Sun Foundation, the Clinical Infectious Diseases Research Endowment Fund from Ms. Teresa Wong On Yik, and the commissioned block grant of the Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases of the Food and Health Bureau of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, SSYen_US
dc.contributor.authorNgan, AHYen_US
dc.contributor.authorRiggs, CMen_US
dc.contributor.authorTeng, JLLen_US
dc.contributor.authorChoi, GKYen_US
dc.contributor.authorPoon, RWSen_US
dc.contributor.authorHui, JJYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLow, FJen_US
dc.contributor.authorLuk, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:52:11Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:52:11Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationVeterinary Microbiology, 2012, v. 155 n. 2-4, p. 399-408en_US
dc.identifier.issn0378-1135en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157678-
dc.description.abstractThe newly described brittle tail syndrome causes weakening and breakage of the tail hair of horses. Extensive mycological and molecular studies showed that a novel fungus Equicapillimyces hongkongensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is the most likely cause of this syndrome. It is a septate branching hyaline mould which grows optimally at 30 °C, requires nicotinic acid but is inhibited by cycloheximide, and specifically infects horse hair. Hyphae fill the core of infected hair shafts with short-necked structures resembling ascomata containing banana-shaped septate ascospore-like structures perforating the hair cortex from within. Compared to asymptomatic horses (n= 31), horses with clinical signs of the syndrome (n= 22) are significantly more likely to have positive E. hongkongensis gen. nov., sp. nov. smear (6.5% vs. 100%), culture (6.5% vs. 72.7%), and PCR (32.3% vs. 100%, P< 0.001 for all). No other potential pathogens were found on bacteriological and mycological culture or PCR (for Trichophyton, Microsporum and Epidermophyton). Genotyping of pure E. hongkongensis gen. nov., sp. nov. isolates and their corresponding direct specimens by PCR and sequencing of the 18S rRNA, ITS1-5.8S-ITS2, 28S rRNA, beta-actin, beta-tubulin, and elongation factor 1 alpha showed that they are all identical but unique, and related distantly to fungi mostly in the class Sordariomycetes and the family Ophiostomataceae. Its geographical distribution, environmental or animal reservoirs are still unknown. Besides the ugly appearance of infected horse tails, this fungus may emerge as another equine pathogen if it affects the skin and hoof of horses. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/vetmicen_US
dc.relation.ispartofVeterinary Microbiologyen_US
dc.subjectDermatophyteen_US
dc.subjectHorsesen_US
dc.subjectKeratinolyticen_US
dc.titleBrittle tail syndrome is an emerging infection in horses caused by a keratinolytic fungus Equicapillimyces hongkongensis gen. nov., sp. noven_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, SSY:samsonsy@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailTeng, JLL:llteng@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY:kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, SSY=rp00395en_US
dc.identifier.authorityTeng, JLL=rp00277en_US
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.vetmic.2011.09.024en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84857049808en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84857049808&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume155en_US
dc.identifier.issue2-4en_US
dc.identifier.spage399en_US
dc.identifier.epage408en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1873-2542-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000301626800038-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, SSY=13310021400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNgan, AHY=14037517900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRiggs, CM=53364284500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTeng, JLL=7202560229en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChoi, GKY=35423450200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoon, RWS=9334879200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, JJY=50961254900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLow, FJ=53363922600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLuk, A=53364085800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, KY=36078079100en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike9857023-

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