File Download
 
Links for fulltext
(May Require Subscription)
 
Supplementary

Article: High incidence of severe influenza among individuals over 50 years of age
  • Basic View
  • Metadata View
  • XML View
TitleHigh incidence of severe influenza among individuals over 50 years of age
 
AuthorsZhang, AJX1
To, KKW1
Tse, H1
Chan, KH1
Guo, KY1
Li, C1
Hung, IFN1
Chan, JFW1
Chen, H1
Tam, S2
Yuen, KY1
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://cdli.asm.org/
 
CitationClinical And Vaccine Immunology, 2011, v. 18 n. 11, p. 1918-1924 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/CVI.05357-11
 
AbstractAge-specific epidemiological data on asymptomatic, symptomatic, and severe infections are essential for public health policies on combating influenza. In this study, we incorporated data on microbiologically confirmed infections and seroprevalence to comprehensively describe the epidemiology of pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza. Seroprevalence was determined from 1,795 random serum samples collected in our hospital in January 2007 (before the first wave of the pandemic) and March 2010 (after the second wave). Data on microbiologically confirmed infection and severe cases were obtained from the Centre for Health Protection in Hong Kong. Severe cases were most common in the 51- to 60-year-old age group. The microbiologically confirmed incidence rate was highest for children aged ≤10 years and dropped sharply for the adult population (ρ = -1.0; P < 0.01), but the incidence rate for severe disease was highest for the 51- to 60-year-old age group. For the 51- to 60-year-old age group, the seroprevalence was similar to that for the younger age groups, but the proportion of severe cases relative to seroprevalence was significantly higher than that for 11- to 50-year-old age groups. As judged from the percentage of specimens positive for other respiratory viruses compared with that for pandemic H1N1 virus, the impact of symptomatic disease due to pandemic H1N1 virus was higher than that for other respiratory viruses in people aged ≤50 years. In conclusion, the 51- to 60-year-old age group, which had the highest overall incidence and the highest rate of severe disease but is currently not considered by the World Health Organization to be an at-risk group, should be prioritized for influenza vaccination in areas where universal influenza vaccination is not practiced. Copyright © 2011, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
 
ISSN1556-6811
2012 Impact Factor: 2.598
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.938
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1128/CVI.05357-11
 
PubMed Central IDPMC3209033
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000296613800019
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Science and Technology Major Project of China2009ZX10004-306
Ted Sun Foundation
Clinical Infectious Diseases Research Endowment Fund
Food and Health Bureau
Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China
Funding Information:

This work was supported by the National Science and Technology Major Project of China (grant 2009ZX10004-306), the Ted Sun Foundation, the Clinical Infectious Diseases Research Endowment Fund from Teresa Wong On Yik, the Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases of the Food and Health Bureau, and the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorZhang, AJX
 
dc.contributor.authorTo, KKW
 
dc.contributor.authorTse, H
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, KH
 
dc.contributor.authorGuo, KY
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, C
 
dc.contributor.authorHung, IFN
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, JFW
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, H
 
dc.contributor.authorTam, S
 
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KY
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:51:59Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:51:59Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractAge-specific epidemiological data on asymptomatic, symptomatic, and severe infections are essential for public health policies on combating influenza. In this study, we incorporated data on microbiologically confirmed infections and seroprevalence to comprehensively describe the epidemiology of pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza. Seroprevalence was determined from 1,795 random serum samples collected in our hospital in January 2007 (before the first wave of the pandemic) and March 2010 (after the second wave). Data on microbiologically confirmed infection and severe cases were obtained from the Centre for Health Protection in Hong Kong. Severe cases were most common in the 51- to 60-year-old age group. The microbiologically confirmed incidence rate was highest for children aged ≤10 years and dropped sharply for the adult population (ρ = -1.0; P < 0.01), but the incidence rate for severe disease was highest for the 51- to 60-year-old age group. For the 51- to 60-year-old age group, the seroprevalence was similar to that for the younger age groups, but the proportion of severe cases relative to seroprevalence was significantly higher than that for 11- to 50-year-old age groups. As judged from the percentage of specimens positive for other respiratory viruses compared with that for pandemic H1N1 virus, the impact of symptomatic disease due to pandemic H1N1 virus was higher than that for other respiratory viruses in people aged ≤50 years. In conclusion, the 51- to 60-year-old age group, which had the highest overall incidence and the highest rate of severe disease but is currently not considered by the World Health Organization to be an at-risk group, should be prioritized for influenza vaccination in areas where universal influenza vaccination is not practiced. Copyright © 2011, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationClinical And Vaccine Immunology, 2011, v. 18 n. 11, p. 1918-1924 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/CVI.05357-11
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1128/CVI.05357-11
 
dc.identifier.epage1924
 
dc.identifier.hkuros208520
 
dc.identifier.hkuros203198
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000296613800019
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Science and Technology Major Project of China2009ZX10004-306
Ted Sun Foundation
Clinical Infectious Diseases Research Endowment Fund
Food and Health Bureau
Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China
Funding Information:

This work was supported by the National Science and Technology Major Project of China (grant 2009ZX10004-306), the Ted Sun Foundation, the Clinical Infectious Diseases Research Endowment Fund from Teresa Wong On Yik, the Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases of the Food and Health Bureau, and the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.

 
dc.identifier.issn1556-6811
2012 Impact Factor: 2.598
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.938
 
dc.identifier.issue11
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3209033
 
dc.identifier.pmid21900532
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80455128645
 
dc.identifier.spage1918
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157654
 
dc.identifier.volume18
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://cdli.asm.org/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofClinical and Vaccine Immunology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshAge Factors
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Over
 
dc.subject.meshChild
 
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshIncidence
 
dc.subject.meshInfant
 
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H1n1 Subtype - Isolation & Purification - Pathogenicity
 
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - Epidemiology - Pathology - Virology
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshSeverity Of Illness Index
 
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult
 
dc.titleHigh incidence of severe influenza among individuals over 50 years of age
 
dc.typeArticle
 
<?xml encoding="utf-8" version="1.0"?>
<item><contributor.author>Zhang, AJX</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>To, KKW</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tse, H</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chan, KH</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Guo, KY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Li, C</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Hung, IFN</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chan, JFW</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chen, H</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tam, S</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Yuen, KY</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2012-08-08T08:51:59Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2012-08-08T08:51:59Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2011</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>Clinical And Vaccine Immunology, 2011, v. 18 n. 11, p. 1918-1924</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>1556-6811</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/157654</identifier.uri>
<description.abstract>Age-specific epidemiological data on asymptomatic, symptomatic, and severe infections are essential for public health policies on combating influenza. In this study, we incorporated data on microbiologically confirmed infections and seroprevalence to comprehensively describe the epidemiology of pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza. Seroprevalence was determined from 1,795 random serum samples collected in our hospital in January 2007 (before the first wave of the pandemic) and March 2010 (after the second wave). Data on microbiologically confirmed infection and severe cases were obtained from the Centre for Health Protection in Hong Kong. Severe cases were most common in the 51- to 60-year-old age group. The microbiologically confirmed incidence rate was highest for children aged &#8804;10 years and dropped sharply for the adult population (&#961; = -1.0; P &lt; 0.01), but the incidence rate for severe disease was highest for the 51- to 60-year-old age group. For the 51- to 60-year-old age group, the seroprevalence was similar to that for the younger age groups, but the proportion of severe cases relative to seroprevalence was significantly higher than that for 11- to 50-year-old age groups. As judged from the percentage of specimens positive for other respiratory viruses compared with that for pandemic H1N1 virus, the impact of symptomatic disease due to pandemic H1N1 virus was higher than that for other respiratory viruses in people aged &#8804;50 years. In conclusion, the 51- to 60-year-old age group, which had the highest overall incidence and the highest rate of severe disease but is currently not considered by the World Health Organization to be an at-risk group, should be prioritized for influenza vaccination in areas where universal influenza vaccination is not practiced. Copyright &#169; 2011, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>American Society for Microbiology. The Journal&apos;s web site is located at http://cdli.asm.org/</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>Clinical and Vaccine Immunology</relation.ispartof>
<subject.mesh>Adolescent</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Adult</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Age Factors</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Aged</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Aged, 80 And Over</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Child</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Child, Preschool</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Female</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Hong Kong - Epidemiology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Humans</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Incidence</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Infant</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Influenza A Virus, H1n1 Subtype - Isolation &amp; Purification - Pathogenicity</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Influenza, Human - Epidemiology - Pathology - Virology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Male</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Middle Aged</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Severity Of Illness Index</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Young Adult</subject.mesh>
<title>High incidence of severe influenza among individuals over 50 years of age</title>
<type>Article</type>
<description.nature>link_to_OA_fulltext</description.nature>
<identifier.doi>10.1128/CVI.05357-11</identifier.doi>
<identifier.pmid>21900532</identifier.pmid>
<identifier.pmcid>PMC3209033</identifier.pmcid>
<identifier.scopus>eid_2-s2.0-80455128645</identifier.scopus>
<identifier.hkuros>208520</identifier.hkuros>
<identifier.hkuros>203198</identifier.hkuros>
<relation.references>http://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80455128645&amp;selection=ref&amp;src=s&amp;origin=recordpage</relation.references>
<identifier.volume>18</identifier.volume>
<identifier.issue>11</identifier.issue>
<identifier.spage>1918</identifier.spage>
<identifier.epage>1924</identifier.epage>
<identifier.isi>WOS:000296613800019</identifier.isi>
<publisher.place>United States</publisher.place>
<bitstream.url>http://hub.hku.hk/bitstream/10722/157654/1/re01.htm</bitstream.url>
</item>
Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Queen Mary Hospital Hong Kong