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Article: Novel reassortment of Eurasian avian-like and pandemic/2009 influenza viruses in swine: Infectious potential for humans
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TitleNovel reassortment of Eurasian avian-like and pandemic/2009 influenza viruses in swine: Infectious potential for humans
 
AuthorsZhu, H3 2 1
Zhou, B2
Fan, X4
Lam, TTY1
Wang, J1 3
Chen, A5
Chen, X2
Chen, H1 3
Webster, RG6
Webby, R6
Peiris, JSM1
Smith, DK1 3
Guan, Y1 3
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jvi.asm.org/
 
CitationJournal Of Virology, 2011, v. 85 n. 20, p. 10432-10439 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.05352-11
 
AbstractPigs are considered to be intermediate hosts and "mixing vessels," facilitating the genesis of pandemic influenza viruses, as demonstrated by the emergence of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic (pdm/09) virus. The prevalence and repeated introduction of the pdm/09 virus into pigs raises the possibility of generating novel swine influenza viruses with the potential to infect humans. To address this, an active influenza surveillance program was conducted with slaughtered pigs in abattoirs in southern China. Over 50% of the pigs tested were found to be seropositive for one or more H1 influenza viruses, most commonly pdm/09-like viruses. Out of 36 virus isolates detected, one group of novel reassortants had Eurasian avian-like swine H1N1 surface genes and pdm/09 internal genes. Animal experiments showed that this virus transmitted effectively from pig to pig and from pig to ferret, and it could also replicate in ex vivo human lung tissue. Immunization against the 2009 pandemic virus gave only partial protection to ferrets. The continuing prevalence of the pdm/09 virus in pigs could lead to the genesis of novel swine reassortant viruses with the potential to infect humans. © 2011, American Society for Microbiology.
 
ISSN0022-538X
2013 Impact Factor: 4.648
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.05352-11
 
PubMed Central IDPMC3187487
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000296254100001
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Institutes of Health (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases)HSN266200700005C
Li Ka Shing Foundation
University Grants Committee of the Hong Kong SARAoE/M-12/06
Funding Information:

This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases contract HSN266200700005C), the Li Ka Shing Foundation, and the Area of Excellence Scheme of the University Grants Committee of the Hong Kong SAR (grant AoE/M-12/06).

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
GrantsControl of Pandemic and Inter-pandemic Influenza
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorZhu, H
 
dc.contributor.authorZhou, B
 
dc.contributor.authorFan, X
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, TTY
 
dc.contributor.authorWang, J
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, A
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, X
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, H
 
dc.contributor.authorWebster, RG
 
dc.contributor.authorWebby, R
 
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSM
 
dc.contributor.authorSmith, DK
 
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Y
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:51:57Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:51:57Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractPigs are considered to be intermediate hosts and "mixing vessels," facilitating the genesis of pandemic influenza viruses, as demonstrated by the emergence of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic (pdm/09) virus. The prevalence and repeated introduction of the pdm/09 virus into pigs raises the possibility of generating novel swine influenza viruses with the potential to infect humans. To address this, an active influenza surveillance program was conducted with slaughtered pigs in abattoirs in southern China. Over 50% of the pigs tested were found to be seropositive for one or more H1 influenza viruses, most commonly pdm/09-like viruses. Out of 36 virus isolates detected, one group of novel reassortants had Eurasian avian-like swine H1N1 surface genes and pdm/09 internal genes. Animal experiments showed that this virus transmitted effectively from pig to pig and from pig to ferret, and it could also replicate in ex vivo human lung tissue. Immunization against the 2009 pandemic virus gave only partial protection to ferrets. The continuing prevalence of the pdm/09 virus in pigs could lead to the genesis of novel swine reassortant viruses with the potential to infect humans. © 2011, American Society for Microbiology.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Virology, 2011, v. 85 n. 20, p. 10432-10439 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.05352-11
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.05352-11
 
dc.identifier.epage10439
 
dc.identifier.hkuros203150
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000296254100001
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Institutes of Health (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases)HSN266200700005C
Li Ka Shing Foundation
University Grants Committee of the Hong Kong SARAoE/M-12/06
Funding Information:

This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases contract HSN266200700005C), the Li Ka Shing Foundation, and the Area of Excellence Scheme of the University Grants Committee of the Hong Kong SAR (grant AoE/M-12/06).

 
dc.identifier.issn0022-538X
2013 Impact Factor: 4.648
 
dc.identifier.issue20
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3187487
 
dc.identifier.pmid21849442
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80054981148
 
dc.identifier.spage10432
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157651
 
dc.identifier.volume85
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jvi.asm.org/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Virology
 
dc.relation.projectControl of Pandemic and Inter-pandemic Influenza
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsJournal of Virology. Copyright © American Society for Microbiology.
 
dc.rightsCopyright © American Society for Microbiology, [Journal of Virology, 2011, v. 85 n. 20, p. 10432-10439]
 
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A virus - classification - genetics - isolation and purification - pathogenicity
 
dc.subject.meshOrthomyxoviridae Infections - transmission - virology
 
dc.subject.meshRNA, Viral - genetics
 
dc.subject.meshReassortant Viruses - classification - genetics - isolation and purification - pathogenicity
 
dc.subject.meshSwine - virology
 
dc.titleNovel reassortment of Eurasian avian-like and pandemic/2009 influenza viruses in swine: Infectious potential for humans
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Shantou University, Medical College (SUMC)
  4. Guangxi Medical University
  5. Wuxi Sangosho Pet Park Co. Ltd.
  6. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital